Biography of Truman Galusha
Chittenden County, VT Biographies





GALUSHA, TRUMAN. Truman Galusha was born in Shaftsbury, Vt., on the 30th of September, 1786. He was the son of Hon. Jonas Galusha and his first wife, Mary, daughter of Governor Thomas Chittenden. Jonas Galusha was born in Norwich, Conn., February 11, 1753. He was the third in direct descent from Jacob Galusha, who, when a boy eight years old, early in the seventeenth century, was brought from Wales, at length settled near Plymouth, Mass., and became the ancestor of a numerous family. In 1769 Jacob Galusha, the son of Daniel and father of Jonas Galusha, with his family moved from Norwich to Salisbury, Conn., and thence in the spring of 1775 to Shaftsbury, Vt., where at length Jonas Galusha became a farmer and pursued that employment through life, except as he was withdrawn from it by official engagements. When the Revolutionary struggle commenced he took an active part in favor of the independence of the colonies. He was a member of a company commanded by his brother David, in Colonel Seth Warner's regiment of "Green Mountain Boys." Previous to the battle of Bennington, August 16, 1777, he became captain of a company of militia, which consisted of two companies previously organized in Shaftsbury. When he received orders from Colonel Moses Robinson to march his company to Bennington he promptly called out his men and led them to the scene of action. As stated in the general chapter relating to the events of this war, the Vermont and New Hampshire militia were compelled to fight and win the battle a second time.

Captain Galusha, it is stated, continued in active military service until the surrender of Burgoyne, and at several other times he with his company was temporarily under arms. In October, 1778, he married Mary Chittenden. In March, 1781, he was elected sheriff of the county of Bennington, which office in the spring of 1787 he resigned. In 1792 he was elected a member of the second Council of Censors. In 1793 he was chosen a member of the Governor's Council, and by successive elections held the office six years. He also held the office of assistant judge of Bennington County Court for three years, beginning with 1795; and in 1800 was again elected, holding the office this time seven years. In 1800, too, he was elected representative from Shaftsbury, and took his seat in the House; but on the morning of the second day resigned his seat, on the ground that he had been elected councilor and had accepted the office. He remained a member of the council seven successive years. He was elected judge of the Supreme Court in 1807, and again in 1808. In 1809 he was chosen an elector of president and vice president, and again in 1821, 1825 and 1829. He was elected governor of the State of Vermont in 1809, and was reelected in 1810, 1811 and 1812. To this important office he was again called in 1815, and was reelected year by year by constantly increasing majorities until 1819, when his competing candidate had only a few more than a thousand votes. He then announced his determination to remain no longer in public life, and in this he persisted, though urged to the contrary not only by his political friends, but by many of the adverse party. The Legislature presented an address in which they said: "In discharging the duties of councilor, judge and governor you have ever merited and received the approbation of your fellow citizens."

According to printed accounts Jonas Galusha was physically, constitutionally strong and active to an advanced period of life. A good observer of men and things, he improved his opportunities for special and general reading, and aptly availed himself of the advantages of his varied life. He was characterized by discernment, and by firmness and steadiness in his pursuits; but after the attainment of favorable results he was inclined to be conciliatory, and allay the excessive heat of party strife. He was not much addicted to public speaking, but when occasion required he could express himself dearly and forcibly. He and his first wife had four sons and three daughters, who arrived at maturity. By another wife he had one daughter.

His elder sons, one of whom was Truman Galusha, passed most of the time of their minority, except when at school, at the home of their father, and as he was to a considerable extent withdrawn by official engagements from direct attention to his home affairs, they had a greater charge and responsibility in regard to those affairs, the experience derived from which was probably favorable to them in after life. Truman Galusha married Lydia Loomis September 17, 1809, who died June 27, 1818, and again, December 23, 1819, Hannah Chittenden, daughter of Hon. Noah Chittenden. She died May 29, 1828. By his first wife he had two sons and one daughter, and by the second one son and three daughters. He commenced business with a moderate patrimony, on a farm of limited extent in Shaftsbury, Vt., and occasionally practiced, as he had calls from neighbors and other persons, the art of surveying.

In February, 1823 or 1824, he and his family, then comprising two sons by his first wife, his second wife, their son and daughter, and attendant, moved from Shaftsbury to the southwesterly part of Jericho, Vt., and after their arrival first occupied the somewhat noted and conspicuous brick house erected, and for a number of years owned and occupied, by the Hon. Noah Chittenden, of whom Truman Galusha purchased the same, together with a considerable farm connected with it, and bordering in part on Onion or Winooski River. This house, last owned by Ellery Fay, was consumed by fire on the 22d of December, 1885. Another noted and conspicuous brick house, in the near vicinity of the one first named, was built by Governor Martin Chittenden, and owned and occupied by him a number of years before he removed to Williston, and is now owned and occupied by Daniel Bishop. In 1832 or 1833 he purchased and removed to the G. O. Dixon farm at Jericho, on Brown's River, and five or six years later removed to a more elevated tract in the more easterly part of the village of Jericho (which is now occupied by his son, Russell L. Galusha), where he died on the 12th of June, 1859. He held the office of selectman, and other town offices for a number of years, representing Jericho in the General Assembly in 1827, 1828 and 1830, and took a leading interest in the management of the affairs of the town. He was a member of the Constitutional Conventions of 1836 and 1843, and a judge of Clittenden County Court in 1849 and 185o. He was assiduous in his business affiairs, and gradually acquired what was considered in his town and vicinity a considerable property. He was also attentive to his duties and offices in the Baptist Church in Jericho, to which he belonged, and to the interests of which, as well as to the general interests of religion, he was devoted. He was never wanting in energy and attention in the discharge of his duties and obligations as a citizen and civil officer. In meetings and public assemblies he could express his views and opinions distinctly, and with effect. He was a person of excellent physique, especially in his youth and prime. At an advanced period of his life he was affected by a femoral ailment attended with a lameness which in a measure disabled him and crippled his active energies.

Two sons and one daughter of Truman Galusha now reside in Jericho. The elder, Truman C., was born in Shaftsbury December 19, 1810, first married Miss Beulah C. Butts, and is now living with his second wife, who was Miss A. O. Bishop. He has four children. Russell L. Galusha, the second son of Truman, was born in Shaftsbury on the 11th of October, 1812, and now occupies the place last occupied by his father. Another son of Truman, Rollin Mallary Galusha, was born in Shaftsbury on the 3oth of September, 182o, and came to Jericho with the rest of the family, where he spent the remainder of his life. In him flowed two currents of influential and energetic blood under different names, and he was worthy of such ancestry. He was always held in the highest esteem by his fellow citizens of the town where he lived and died. Few men have been more universally beloved among relatives, and as a man of general intelligence, of sterling integrity, and of kindly sympathies, he will be long and affectionately remembered. His generous feeling and cordial Christian fellowship was attractive, and in him every man found a friend and every Christian a brother. He died in Jericho on the r4th of May, 1886, leaving a widow née Carrie McEwen, and three daughters.

Clara J., wife of L. B. Howe, of Jericho, is a daughter of Truman Galusha. They have three sons living. Another daughter, Mrs. Ellen Maria Howe, widow of George P. Howe, resides at Loon Lake, Franklin county, N. Y., and has two daughters.

From:
History of Chittenden County, Vermont
Edited by: W. S. Rann
D. Mason & Co., Publishers
Syracuse, New York. 1886


Privacy Policy for OnlineBiographies

NAVIGATION

Chittenden County, VT
Biographies

Vermont
Biographies

Online
Biographies

New York
Histories

New York
Biographies

Maine
Histories

Pennsylvania
Histories

Pennsylvania
Biographies

For all your genealogy needs visit Linkpendium

Family Tree Maker 2012