Biography of Charles A. Quigley
Utah Biographies





CHARLES ANDREW QUIGLEY
Charles Andrew Quigley was born June 6, 1862, in Dubuque, Iowa, son of John P. and Margaret A. Quigley, the elder Quigley being a physician and surgeon. Charles A. Quigley was educated in the schools of Dubuque, Iowa, and came to Utah in 1893 to assume charge of the business in Utah and Idaho of the Studebaker Bros. Company, now the Studebaker Bros. Company of Utah. On March 2, 1898, he was married to Miss Effie Elinore Gee, and they have two children, Charles G., aged ten, and Frederick, aged six.

Mr. Quigley has been a popular man since he came West, and this, combined with his sterling business qualities, accounts for the large measure of success he has achieved for himself as well as for the interests he represents. He is a member of the Alta Club, the Elks Club, the Salt Lake Commercial Club, the Country Club, the Salt Lake Press Club, and the Commercial Club of Boise. His home is at 204 East Third South Street, Salt Lake City.

One of the great characteristics as a citizen is his civic usefulness. Every public question that conies up receives his attention, and his opinion on any subject is valued. His participation in politics is limited to voting, and he has never sought or held political office. The company whose business he manages with distinguished ability is one of the heaviest patrons of the railroads in the State, both transcontinental and local, and his house, like other commercial institutions in the State, has gone into the fight for better freight rates for the intermountain country in earnest. Mr. Quigley has been a member of the Commercial Club from its organization seven years ago, and was instrumental and, in fact, the leading force in organizing the traffic bureau of the club, and in securing the services as traffic director of S. H. Babcock, for many years traffic manager of the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad system. Mr. Quigley was chosen unanimously as president of the traffic bureau, and his work is now beginning to bear fruit, the Interstate Commerce Commission having taken official notice of the complaint of unfair treatment of Utah shippers by the railroads, and ordered an investigation.

As an evidence of Mr. Quigley's activity in the expansion of the business of the Studebaker Bros. Company of Utah since his arrival here and his assumption of its management iii 1893, the following list of branch houses he has established in that time is cited: Utah-American Fork, Spanish Fork, St. George, Vernal, Bountiful, Brigham City, Coalville, Heber City, Junction City, Logan, Mt. Pleasant, Morgan, Murray, ephi, Fillmore, Ogden, Payson, Park City, Provo, Price, Richfield, Idaho-American Falls, Blackfoot, Idaho Falls, Mackay, Pocatello, Rexburg.

In the headquarters at Salt Lake and in the larger branches the stocks carried are enormous and include all classes of farm machinery, automobiles, farm wagons, electric trucks of all capacities, electric runabouts and phaetons, gasoline touring cars, harness, and all kinds of light and heavy vehicles, for speeding or hauling, including drays and furniture vans, and a great variety of smaller articles.

From:
Sketches of the Inter-Mountain States
1847 - 1909
Utah Idaho Nevada
Published by: The Salt Lake Tribune
Salt Lake City, Utah 1909


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