Biography of Fred W. Patterson
Allegheny County, PA Biographies





FRED W. PATTERSON, chief road engineer of Allegheny county, is the son of John W. and Almina (Wendt) Patterson, and was born in what is known as South Side, or Birmingham, Pittsburg, Jan. 29, 1860. Among the first pioneers in Allegheny county was his great great grandfather, Nathaniel Patterson, born in Culpepper county, Va., in 1729, who accompanied General Washington to this point when he made his first perilous trip across the mountains with a surveying party. He was an assistant surveyor to Washington in that expedition, and aided in establishing the original survey in this vicinity. The French and Indian war coming on, the party was compelled to return to Virginia and get ready for the conflict which was to decide the ownership of this disputed territory. After the close of the war, or about 1760, he returned to this locality with his family and settled near Dravosburg, in Mifflin township, where he died, Aug. 9, 1795. The farm on which he settled is still in the possession of his descendants. His son, Andrew Patterson, the great grandfather of our subject, was born in Culpeper county, Va., in 1755, and came to MitBin township with his father. He became a surveyor of note, and died in 1808. His son, Nathaniel Patterson, the grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was born in Mifflin township in 1795. He served in the War of 1812 as corporal in a regiment known as the "Pittsburg Blues." was a surveyor by profession, and was elected recorder of Allegheny county in 1859. As stated in the beginning of this sketch, John W. Patterson and Almina (Wendt) Patterson were the parents of Fred W. Patterson, the former, John W., being born in Chartiers township, Allegheny county, on May 4, 1835, where he was reared to manhood. On the breaking out of the great Civil war, he offered his services in defense of the Union, and was made colonel of the 102d regiment, Pennsylvania volunteer infantry. He participated with his command in many hotly contested engagements, but was killed at the battle of the Wilderness, on May 5, 1864. The G. A. R. post. No. 151, of Pittsburg, was named in honor of him. Fred W. Patterson received his earlier education in the public schools of Pittsburg; later he completed a course in civil engineering at the Western University of Pennsylvania, after which he accepted a position with the Pennsylvania railroad company, and remained with them until 1887, when he accepted the position of chief engineer with the Pittsburg & Lake Erie railroad, which he filled until 1889. He then engaged with the Baltimore & Ohio railroad as engineer of maintenance of way for its Pittsburg division, which position he held until elected city engineer of McKeesport, in 1891, where for six years, or until appointed to his present position, he faithfully served his constituency. Since 1897, when he became chief road engineer of Allegheny county, he has accomplished wonderful improvements in the development of the public highways, and the wisdom of his selection for that important position has been fully demonstrated. In New Brighton, on June 11, 1885, occurred his marriage with Miss Mary Searight, an estimable young lady of that place. They have had four children, two of whom are living: John W., who is at present a cadet at the New York military academy, and David F. Mr. Patterson joined the Masonic order in 1881, and became a member of Tancred commandery in 1887, and a Shriner in the same year. We have briefly compiled in this sketch a few facts pertaining to the life and ancestry of one of Allegheny county's native sons, who, reared here, is devoting the best efforts of his life in behalf of her people and the generations to follow.


From:
Memoirs of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania
personal and genealogical with portraits.
Publishers: Northwestern Historical Association
Madison, Wis. 1904.


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