Biography of Carl A. Starker
Oregon Biographies





CARL ALLISON STARKER.
The soil and climate of the Willamette valley are peculiarly adapted to the growing of flowers. Indeed, both horticulture and floriculture are exceptionally pleasant and profitable here. Certainly Carl A. Starker of Jennings Lodge, Clackamas county, has found this to be the case. One of Oregon's adopted sons who removed with his parents, Charles and Sophia (Keuchman) Starker, from his native state of Iowa when he was fifteen years of age, Carl continued his education at the Washington high school of Portland and entered the Oregon Agricultural College, from which he was graduated in 1914 as a horticulturist. With characteristic thoroughness he laid a solid foundation for his business by taking employment for a year in a Portland florist's shop in order to ascertain at first hand what the public demanded. At the end of this time he purchased two acres of land at Hull avenue station on the Portland and Oregon City electric line and erected here two greenhouses, each thirty five by two hundred feet, and one, twenty two by one hundred feet. While Mr. Starker's business may be known as a general nursery, carrying all varieties of flowers, plants, shrubs and bulbs, he has made a specialty of sweet peas, ferns and calla lilies His most extensive patronage comes from the florist shops of Portland and the neighboring towns of Oregon, where his floral designs for all occasions, particularly wedding decorations and funeral pieces, have won him merited recognition.

In 1915 Mr. Starker married Miss Louise Hammond, the daughter of A. S. Hammond, an attorney of North Bend, Oregon. They have two children, Charles Hammond and Mary Louise, who take a comprehensive and active interest in all that concerns the nursery. Mrs. Starker had been a fellow student of her husband in college and she has assisted him materially in developing and extending his business. The severe winter of 1919-1920 caused them serious loss through the freezing of stock and the partial destruction of the greenhouses, but the same degree of youthful courage and undaunted optimism which has done so much for the upbuilding of Oregon, came readily to their assistance in repairing the damage.

To develop floriculture to a degree which renders it a fine art as well as a profitable business enterprise, by sheer force of initiative, energy and industry, is a worthy achievement. Mr. and Mrs. Starker have been happy in this accomplishment.

From:
History of Oregon Illistrated
Vol. 3
BY: Charles H. Carney
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland 1922


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