Biography of Edward E. Brodie
Oregon Biographies





Edward Everett Brodie is widely recognized throughout the state of Oregon as a leader among newspaper men. The value of the local newspaper in the upbuilding of the best interests of any community is universally conceded, and the Morning Enterprise has indeed been a large factor in the development of Oregon City. Mr. Brodie is a native of Oregon, born in this state in 1876, a son of Elias and Jane Matilda (Goff) Brodie. The Brodies are of pure Scotch ancestry and the great grandfather of Mr. Brodie emigrated from Scotland to this country in its early days. His father, a native of Kentucky, was a soldier who served in the army of the United States for over half a century and settled in Oregon in the year 1868. His mother's family was from New England.

Mr. Brodie received a good education, first attending the grade and high schools of Astoria and later the University of Oregon. The call of the newspaper world was strong and immediately upon finishing his education he secured work on a newspaper. For some time he was connected with the Astoria Budget and his service on that paper laid the foundation for his later work. Seeing opportunities in the newspaper field he removed to Oregon City in 1901 and accepted a position on the Enterprise, which paper is one of the three oldest newspapers in the state and has served its community for over fifty years. For seven years he worked on the Enterprise and in that time studied every phase of the workings of the institution until he knew every step taken in the publishing of the news from the time it was brought in by the reporters until it was taken off of the press and distributed to the newsboys. He was not afraid of work and took advantage of every opportunity offered to increase his knowledge. Finally he purchased the Enterprise and in 1910 started to issue a paper daily. The venture proved to be successful and for the past ten years the Morning Enterprise has been one of the leading papers of the Willamette valley. Mr. Brodie is a fighter but he fights fair and believes in facing public questions without regard to his personal interests. There are no half way measures nor compromises for E. E. Brodie.

The esteem in which he is held by newspaper men is evidenced by the fact that he is vice president of the National Editorial Association as well as ex president of the Oregon Editorial Association. It is widely conceded that upon his retirement from the presidency of the Oregon Editorial Association that body was the best organization of its kind in the country. He has been a member of various other organizations and in 1916 was one of the members appointed on the board to investigate the penitentiary, the report of which board brought about many reforms. Being always interested in the moral and intellectual development of his community he has also served as secretary of the board of education of the city since 1904, secretary of the Commercial Club of Oregon City, director of the Oregon State Chamber of Commerce and of the McLoughlin Memorial Association. He is also an active member of the Pacific Northwest Tourist Association and of the Portland Press Club.

In 1905 Mr. Brodie was united in marriage to Miss Imogen Harding, daughter of George A. Harding and great granddaughter of Samuel K. Barlow. Samuel K. Barlow settled in Oregon in 1845 and was the builder of the famous road known as the Barlow Road, extending from eastern Oregon to the Willamette valley and saving the bateau journey down the Columbia and Willamette rivers. Of this great pathfinder, Judge Deady of the United States supreme court said: "The building of the Barlow Road contributed more toward the prosperity of the Willamette valley and the future state of Oregon than any other achievement prior to the building of the railway in 1870." Mrs. Brodie's great grandmother was Susanna Lee of South Carolina, whose father, William Lee, was a lieutenant of artillery in the Revolutionary war and was crippled for life by the bursting of a shell. Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Brodie: George Harding and Madelon Jane, both of whom are pupils of the Oregon City schools.

Besides the many organizations with which he is affiliated Mr. Brodie is also a member of the Elks, the Masons, Woodman of the World, regent of the Royal Arcanum and a member of the State Grange. Although he has never sought nor accepted public office Mr. Brodie has always been an active member of the republican party and personally and with the aid of his paper has fought all of the battles of his party to the finish. He has always fought against the waste of public money, especially in road building and as a result of his efforts in this direction Clackamas county is the only county in the state that has installed its own plant for hard surface road building. For many years Mr. Brodie has been a member of the republican county committee and he is now serving as chairman of that body.

As the result of his devotion to his newspaper work, his business and political activity, he is numbered among the prominent men of the state. For years he has been closely identified with the history of the city in which he resides, as a representative of one of its most important business interests. Being a man of keen discrimination and sound iudgment his executive ability and excellent management has brought to his newspaper a large degree of success, and through his paper he has done much good for the community, county and state. It may be truly said of him that he believes that "Not the good that comes to us, but the good that comes to the world through us, is the measure of our success."

From:
History of Oregon Illistrated
Vol. 3
BY: Charles H. Carney
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland 1922


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