Biography of Hon. Edward L. Taylor
Franklin County, Ohio Biographies





Hon. Edward L. Taylor. - Representing two of the oldest families in Franklin County, the Taylors and Livingstons, Edward L. Taylor, Jr., in his work as a lawyer at the Columbus bar through a third of a century, with eight years in Congress as representative of the Twelfth Ohio District, has added some important new distinctions to the worthy family traditions in Ohio. Mr. Taylor is general counsel for one of the largest oil refining and distributing companies in the country, the Pure Oil Company.

The history of the Taylor family is traced back in unbroken line to the early years of the 17th century. About 1612 a branch of the family moved from Scotland to the north of Ireland. In 1722 Matthew Taylor came to America and settled among other Scotch-Irish people in the colony at Derry, New Hampshire. After the close of the French and English War in 1763, when the English dominion was extended over Canada, a number of pioneers from the original English colonies moved into the New English territory. Matthew Taylor, a son of the original settler, Matthew, about 1764, with his wife and children, settled in Nova Scotia. One of the children was Robert Taylor, who was born in 1759. He grew up at Truro, Nova Scotia, where in 1781 he married Mehetabel Wilson. Robert Taylor in 1806 brought his family to Ohio and after two years at Chillicothe moved to Franklin County, and in 1808 built a house on the west bank of Walnut Creek in what is now Truro Township. This was the first frame house in that part of the country. He lived there until his death in 1828. Truro Township in Franklin County was named for the old community of Nova Scotia from which the Taylor family came.

David Taylor, a son of Robert Taylor, was born at Truro, Nova Scotia, July 24, 1801, and he grew up at the old homestead in Franklin County. In 1826 he married Nancy T. Nelson and then established a home near his father's old place and in 1858 moved to the city of Columbus, where he lived until his death in 1889. The third wife of David Taylor was Margaret Livingston. They were married in May, 1836. She was the oldest daughter of Judge Edward Chinn Livingston, and a granddaughter of Colonel James Livingston. Colonel James Livingston was born in New York, was a lawyer by profession, and was practicing law in Quebec when the Revolutionary War began. He left Canada and returning to his native state became a colonel in the Continental line and served in the Quebec expedition under General Richard Montgomery. It was at his suggestion that the township of Montgomery in Franklin County was so named. Colonel Livingston after the war, as one of the patriots who had returned from Canada to espouse the cause of independence, was given a grant of land in what was known as the "refugee" tract in Ohio, then the northwest territory. His land was in Franklin County and included a portion of the present city of Columbus. The Livingston farm embraced the present Livingston Park, as well as additional land lying along Livingston Avenue, which was named for Judge Edward C. Livingston, who came to Ohio in 1800. He was a graduate of Union College, New York, and was an able lawyer, but never active in politics, though he was associate judge of Franklin County from 1821 until 1829. His home was in that section where the original Livingston farm was located and on the west bank of Alum Creek. Of the same New York family were Philip and Robert Livingston, signers of the Declaration of Independence.

Edward L. Taylor, Sr., second son of David and Margaret (Livingston) Taylor, was born in Franklin County, March 20, 1839, and was graduated from Miami University in 1860. He began the study of law in Columbus, and when the Civil War broke out he served as a private in a volunteer company, and in 1862 raised a company and was commissioned an officer of the 95th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He participated in the siege of Vicksburg, but at its close was incapacitated for further duty and resigned his commission. He was admitted to the bar in 1862 and for a great many years was a strong and able lawyer of the capital city. He was a staunch Republican but never consented to be a candidate for any important political office. On July 14, 1864, he married Catherine Noble Myers, a granddaughter of Colonel John Noble of Franklin County.

Edward L. Taylor, Jr., third son of Edward L. Taylor, was one of five children born to his parents. He was born in Columbus, August 10, 1869, and was reared there. He was graduated from Columbus High School in 1887, and studied law in his father's office. He was admitted to the bar in December, 1891, and for a number of years was associated with his father and his uncle Henry Taylor, in the practice of law. In the general election of 1899 he was elected prosecuting attorney of Franklin County, defeating Albert Lee Thurman, a grandson of the Democratic statesman, Allen E. Thurman. He was reelected in 1901 and in the fall of 1904 was elected to represent the Twelfth Ohio District in the 59th Congress, taking his seat on March 4, 1905. He was reelected for three successive terms, serving the Sixtieth, Sixty first and Sixty second Congresses. He was regarded as one of the ablest members of the Ohio delegation in Congress during the early years of the present century, and he was elevated to membership on the appropriation committee. In 1912 he was defeated for reelection and since then has devoted his time and abilities to the law practice. His law firm handled the organization of the Pure Oil Company and in 1921 Mr. Taylor, in association with Mr. A. C. Harvey, became general counsel for the corporation. Within a few years this organization has expanded its facilities until it is one of the greatest oil producing and refining companies in the world.

On January 4, 1894, Mr. Taylor was united in marriage with Miss Marie Agnes Firestone, of Columbus. Her father, the late Clinton D. Firestone, was for many years president of the Columbus Buggy Company, a great establishment known for many years as the carriage and vehicle factory, and later a pioneer establishment for the manufcature of automobiles.

Mr. Taylor was crowned a Thirty third Degree Mason in the Northern Mason Jurisdiction of the United States, and is a member of Scioto Consistory, Thirty second Degree. He belongs to Aladdin Temple, of which he was Past Potentate in 1908 and 1909. He is also a member of the Columbus Club.

From:
History of Franklin County, Ohio
By:Opha Moore
Historical Publishing Company
Topeka - Indianapolis 1930


Privacy Policy for OnlineBiographies

NAVIGATION

Franklin County, OH
Biographies

Online
Biographies

New York
Histories

New York
Biographies

Maine
Histories

Pennsylvania
Histories

Pennsylvania
Biographies

For all your genealogy needs visit Linkpendium

Family Tree Maker 2012