Biography of Edward D. Howard
Franklin County, Ohio Biographies





Edward D. Howard. - One of the prominent attorneys practicing at the bar of Columbus, and an able exponent of the dignity and resourcefulness of his profession, is Edward D. Howard. He was born in Columbus, the son of Mitchell C. and Kate (Thompson) Howard.

Mitchell C. Howard was born in Columbus in 1841, the son of Edwin D. and Nancy L. (Clark) Howard. He was a native of Massachusetts, where he was born in Berkshire County in 1817. He came to Ohio about 1833 and located in the rapidly growing town of Columbus. He was instrumental in founding the broom manufacturing business in 1836 which he conducted for many years, and which was continued by his son, Mitchell C. Howard, until his death. Edward D. and Nancy L. (Clark) Howard are deceased and are buried in Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus.

Kate (Thompson) Howard was a daughter of Rev. John W. Thompson, who was one of several brothers, and an early pioneer of Ohio. He was a wagon maker by trade which he followed during the week, but occupied the pulpits of the pioneer churches on Sundays. He was one of the prominent preachers of the Presbyterian Church in the early days and was the founder and first minister of the First Presbyterian Church of Reynoldsburg, Franklin County. One of his brothers, Reverend George Thompson, was conspicuous by his opposition to slavery, and became one of the leading abolitionists in the state for many years before the Civil War. He distinguished himself in the so called "Underground Railway" that was formed to conduct slaves from the South across the United States to Canada. He was a near friend and associate of Rev. Elijah Parish Lovejoy, an antislavery advocate, who was mobbed and finally shot at Alton, Illinois, in 1837, by the pro slavery advocates of that region. Upon the death of Lovejoy, his brother Owen Lovejoy, conducted a more religious campaign against slavery in Illinois, and was greatly aided by Rev. George Thompson, whose operations in the "Underground Railway" became more active and effective than before. He joined the strong anti slavery movements at Alton, and carried his underground operations across the river to Missouri. He was finally arrested by the Missouri authorities, convicted under the Fugitive Slave Law, sentenced to imprisonment and served a term in the Missouri Penitentiary. But never during his life did he regard this service as a disgrace; he regarded it as a glorious martyrdom. Originally the Thompsons resided at Morristown, New Jersey.

Mitchell C. Howard died November 5, 1922, and his wife died December 8, 1923. Both are buried in Green Lawn Cemetery.

Edward D. Howard received a liberal education in the public schools of Westerville, Otterbein College, and Ohio State University. At the latter institution he took two courses, academic and law, and graduated in 1894 with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. From the beginning he has taken an active, candid and prominent part in local, state and national politics, and has distinguished himself as a leader of the Republicans in Columbus and vicinity. At an early stage of the political game, he was brought forth as a candidate for the State Senate by the Republicans to represent Franklin and Pickaway Counties was elected and served with credit and distinction during the session of 1900-1902. His unusual capacity for satisfactory public service was still further disclosed when, in 1903, he was appointed assistant secretary of state under Secretary of State Laylin, in which capacity he served with much credit for three years. Prior to these events he served as assistant prosecuting attorney of Franklin County, also a term in the city council, and also was secretary of the Code Commission that compiled the last Code of the state.

In early manhood Mr. Howard married Eliza Miller, daughter of the lath James T. and Esther (Everett) Miller. The former died January 20, 1920, and the latter died in May, 1909. Both are buried in Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus. Mr. Miller was a farmer and owned about 1,000 acres of land where the beautiful addition of Upper Arlington now stands. He sold this farm to The Upper Arlington Company and retired. He was the son of Dr. Henry and Almeda (Warner) Miller, who came to Columbus in the early forties. Dr. Henry Miller died in 1890, and his wife died in 1917, aged 95 years. Both are buried in Green Lawn Cemetery. His brother, Thomas Miller, was a former sheriff of Franklin County. Doctor Miller was a physician, located at Etna, Ohio, and later became owner of the Ohio State Journal. At one time he was owner of the Columbus Street Railway Company, and was also engaged in the manufacture of boots and shoes. During the Civil War he was in charge of furnishing equipment for hospitals.

To Edward D. and Eliza (Miller) Howard two children were born: Eliza M., married Guy H. Merry, of Augusta, Georgia, a brick manufacturer, and they have one child, Edward Howard Merry; and Edward D. Howard, Jr.

Mr. Howard is a member of the American Bar Association, the Franklin County and State Bar Associations, a trustee of the Franklin County Pioneer Association, a Mason and Kiwanian.

From:
History of Franklin County, Ohio
By:Opha Moore
Historical Publishing Company
Topeka - Indianapolis 1930


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