Biography of Charles E. Cooke
Erie County, OH Biographies





CHARLES EDDY COOKE. Of the families and individuals who had most to do with the early settlement, development and latter day growth of the City of Sandusky, one that deserves conspicuous mention was represented by the late Charles Eddy Cooke, who was for many years a prominent merchant at Sandusky and whose death took away from that city a man whose business and personal character was of the highest typed.

Charles Eddy Cooke was born in Perkins Township in Erie County, Ohio. His father was Prof. Augustus Cooke, a native of Connecticut, and what was uncommon at that time a man of college education. He came to Erie County about 1830 and was usefully identified with the community in the capacity of an educator and lived here until his death. Augustus Cooke was twice married, and the maiden name of his second wife was Mary Ann Eddy. She was born in Connecticut, a daughter of Roswell Eddy. Roswell Eddy was also a native of Connecticut, was reared and married there, but soon after the War of 1812 joined a company of several families and came out to Ohio. They came over the mountains and out to the Southern shore of Lake Erie with wagons and teams. bringing household goods. farm implements, live stock and poultry. The chickens and turkeys were driven ahead of the teams by the children. At night these fowls would take to the trees and then the company camped wherever the poultry determined upon a roosting place. After several weeks of travel they reached what is now Perkins Township in Erie County, but then a portion of Huron County. There Mr. Eddy bought a tract of timbered land, erected a typical log cabin, and began life in what was then the westernmost state in the Union, all the country to the west as far as the Mississippi being a sparsely inhabited region under territorial form of government. Mr. Eddy cleared up a farm out of the wilderness, and continued to live there until his death. Roswell Eddy married a Miss Taylor. Their daughter, Mary Ann (Eddy) Cooke survived her husband many years and died at the home of her son William at the age of eighty four. She reared three sons: Charles Eddy; William Joseph, who was for many years bookkeeper in banks in Sandusky, and George Augustus, who was associated with his brother Charles in business.

Charles Eddy Cooke was twelve years old when his father died, and after that he lived with his maternal grandparents. He was given a good education, and was advised to take up the profession of medicine, and acting on this counsel he studied for a time with Doctor Tilden. The profession not proving to his liking, he turned to merchandising, and became clerk in the store of David Everett at Sandusky. He soon mastered the details of the business, saved his earnings, and then invested in a stock of goods and began business on his own account. His brother George soon afterwards became associated with him, and by close attention to their work and with increasing capital they enjoyed a position among the foremost merchants. Mr. Cooke invested his surplus capital in city real estate, and after disposing of his business ten or fifteen years ago devoted all his time to the management of a property which had greatly increased in value. He died at Sandusky in 1909.

Charles Eddy Cooke married Mary A. Turney. She was born in Syracuse, New York. Her father, William Latta Tourney, was born in Philadelphia, a son of Prof. Samuel Turney, who was a native of Connecticut and of early English ancestry. He was a lineal descendant of Nicholas Pynchon, at one time Lord Mayor of London. The line of descent is as follows: Judge William Pynchon, son of Nicholas, came to America and was treasurer of the Massachusetts Bay Colony; his son, Col. John Pynchon, has been referred to in history as one of the "Connecticut River Gods" (see History of Springfield, Massachusetts, and Encyclopedia Brittanica); he married Amy Wyllys, daughter of Gov. George Wyllys; their son Col. John Puncheon, Jr., married Margaret Hubbard; their son Maj. John Pynchon married Bathsheba Taylor; their son Joseph was the father of Margaret Pynchon, who in turn was the grandmother of Prof. Samuel Timmy. Prof. Samuel Turney was a college graduate, held the position of tutor in Yale College, and after his marriage remove to Philadelphia and was in educational work in Pennsylvania until failing health caused him to go South to South Carolina where he was a tutor in the family of Governor Laurens His death occurred in middle life. William Latta Turney, father of Mrs. Cooke, was still a boy when his father died, and thereafter lived with his uncle and grandparents in Connecticut, where he was given a liberal education. He inherited the estate of his uncle, and going to New York engaged in mercantile business in that state, and was a prominent man at Syracuse until the early '50s. He was attracted to the new State of California, shipping a stock of goods around the cape and himself crossing the Isthmus. He contracted a disease during the voyage and died soon after landing in California. William L. Turney married Aruba Hoyt, who, after the death of her husband, went to Wisconsin and lived in Portage City for a time, but spent her last years with Mrs. Cooke in Sandusky. She reared three daughters: Elizabeth K., Mary Augusta and Josephine A. The first of these daughters lives in Minneapolis and the last with Mrs. Cooke.

Mr. and Mrs. Cooke reared two daughters, Ella and May. They also had a son Augustus who died in his fourth year. The daughter Ella married Henry A. Morgan and has two daughters named Mary and Josephine. May married Lewis Lea, and at her death left six children, named, Charles, George, Margaret, Mary Virginia, Richard James and Elizabeth Kathryn.

The late Mr. Cooke was a Methodist, while Mrs. Cooke and her sister have membership in Grace Episcopal Church at Sandusky. The home which Mrs. Cooke occupies on Wayne Street at the corner of Adams is one of the attractive landmarks of the Sandusky residence district. It was built by Mr. Bell, at one time president of the Mad River Railroad Company, and Mr. Bell being a bachelor the home was built to suit his special requirements. It was put up in the early '40s, and has been standing on Wayne Street for seventy years or more. It is a stone building, with very thick walls, with well arranged interior, large windows, and is both a comfortable and quaint old place. This home was once the scene of entertainment by Major Camp (a retired U. S. A. officer, who had acquired the home, before it was finished) of Gen. Winfield Scott with his entire suite. Mrs. Cooke maintains the old home, the walls adorned with many fine paintings, and the visitor finds a constant charm and interest in the large collection of objects which have been purchased and gathered by Mrs. Cooke while traveling abroad.

From:
A Standard History of Erie County, Ohio
By: Hewson L. Peeke
Assisted by a Board of Advisory Editors
The Lewis Publishing Company Chicago and New York 1916


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