Biography of James Leffel
Springfield, Clark County, OH Biographies





JAMES LEFFEL, deceased, Springfield. The career of James Leffel cuts an important figure in Springfield history, and although he passed from earthly scenes fourteen years ago, he is as fresh in the recollection of many as if he had but died a month ago. He was one of those positive natures that makes itself felt in whatever sphere it may happen to exist. He was born in Botetourt Co., Va., April 19, 1806, hence was, at death, June 11, 1866, just turned three score; came with his parents to Ohio when 9 months old; fought his own way in life. On July 4, 1830, he celebrated this National holiday by his marriage with Miss Mary A. Croft, born Nov. 7, 1813, and a native of Ohio. Of six sons and three daughters, only two sons now survive: Warren Leffel (born March 25, 1851), partner in the "Leffel water wheel" interest, and Ed C. Leffel (July 4, 1857). Their daughter Eliza (now deceased) married Mr. John W. Bookwalter, who is now the head of the extensive water wheel interest; Frederick Leffel was a member of the military organization known as the "Squirrel Hunters" during the war, and died July 30, 1865; their oldest son was lost at sea. Mr. James Leffel was a natural mechanic and an inventive genius, and to him is due the credit of erecting the first foundry in the vicinity of Springfield, which was situated near Buck Creek bridge, two miles west, and completed on Jan. 1, 1840. So great was the increase of his business he found it necessary to build another, which he located north of Springfield, and completed in the spring of 1846. The same year, in company with one Richards, he built the Leffel & Richards extension cotton mill on Barnett's water power; 1852 found him extensively interested in several manufacturing and mechanical enterprises, among which was the manufacture of stoves on his own patent" The Buckeye" and the "Double Oven" stoves, both of which were very popular in their "day and generation." The foundry, which was a separate interest, was carried on under the name of Leffel, Cook & Blakeney; the stove interest was Leffel & Harrison. He had already, at this early date, gone into the manufacture of horse power threshing machines, a patent lever jack and a patent water wheel, which was the early ancestor of the present celebrated turbine water wheel, which was perfected about the year 1862, and was subsequently put into a stock company of which James Leffel, James S. Goode, John Foos and John W. Bookwalter (his son in law), were the proprietors. Several minor changes occurred before his death which left his family abundantly provided for. His widow, Mrs. Mary Leffel, retained, within a year or two, her interest in the manufacturing concern, but this important industry as now constituted, is conducted under the name of James Leffel & Co., and consists of John W. Bookwalter, Warren Leffel, Frank Bookwalter, and others, a fuller description of which will be found in the industrial department of the history proper. Mr. Leffel was a man of unflagging, undeviating integrity, and a valuable element in any community. Mrs. Leffel is an unpretentious motherly woman, charitable and generous, and is only spoken of in terms of kindness and esteem. Such people as this worthy couple have made Springfield what it is.

From:
History of Clark County, Ohio
W. H. Beers & Co.
Chicago 1881


Privacy Policy for OnlineBiographies

NAVIGATION

Clark County, Ohio
Biographies

Online
Biographies

New York
Histories

New York
Biographies

Maine
Histories

Pennsylvania
Histories

Pennsylvania
Biographies

For all your genealogy needs visit Linkpendium

Family Tree Maker 2012