Biography of Samuel and Clementina Lyman
Wayne County, NY Biographies





Lyman, Samuel and Clementina (Evarts) Lyman were born in Salisbury, Conn., the former August 18,1794, the latter July 7, 1793. They removed to Rose (then Wolcott) N.Y., in February, 1818, coming with sled and oxen, and were seventeen days on the road. They endured with patience and hope the privations and discomforts incident to all settlers of a new heavily timbered country, subject to malarial diseases, from the annual drying of undrained swamps. For a number of winters Mr. Lyman taught school, and his help mate, taking advantage of a trade learned in Connecticut, supplied many of her neighbors with that indispensable article of feminine attire, a bonnet, and by united efforts they succeeded in keeping the wolf from the door. Their children were: Caroline, born, May 7. 1817; John, born April 28, 1819; Mary, born May 16, 1821; Charles and David (twins), born February 7, 1824; Lavius H., born April 15, 1828; Frederick, born July 21, 1830; Mavia E., born May 31, 1833; Samuel E, born June 16, 1836. Samuel Lyman died May 28, 1877, his wife having died June 25, 1870. In politics Mr. Lyman was a partisan only in so far as he believed the action of his party to be in line with public interests and individual rights. He was originally a Democrat., but in the Morgan excitement he became an anti Mason, and, in succession, a Whig, Liberty party man, Free Soiler, and, last of all, a Republican. He was the leading abolitionist of Rose, and occasionally his house was used as a station on the underground railroad. He was also one of the earliest temperance men, and the first cold water raising in town was that of a barn built by him in 1830, where the cold water and hot water forces met in a trial of strength, and for a while the result seemed doubtful, one party raising up and the other party pulling down; but the hot water men were finally beaten, and with bruised fingers and trailing colors abandoned the contest. They succeeded some half dozen times in forcing back the first bent after it had taken quite a start upward, and at the next attempt, when the beam had reached the proper height to make the action effective, a stout beechen lever in the hands of Elizur Flint was swept along its length, to the detriment of numerous fingers that were tugging at its upper instead of its under side, and the bent moved steadily to its place, to the great disgust of the whiskyites, a near by whiskey seller saying he would rather have given $5 than to see the barn go up; but the joke was, he had no $5 to give. Conspicuous among the men who stood for the right on that occasion were Elizur Flint, Chauncey Bishop, Stephen Collins, Joel N. Lee, Rev. Ansel Gardiner, and C. W. Fairbank. Samuel Lyman was social, humorous, witty, a good story teller, intelligent, argumentative, honest, and his motto was: "Do Right"

From:
Landmarks of Wayne County, New York
Edited by: Hon. George W. Cowles
Assisted by: H. P. Smith and others
D. Mason & Co., Publishers
Syracuse, N. Y. 1895


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