Biography of Ransom & Esbon Blackmar
Wayne County, NY Biographies





Blackmar, Ransom and Esbon, came to Newark in the fall of 1826. The former died December 31, 1841, and Esbon November 19, 1857. A. T. came in 1833 and Orrin in the spring of 1835. Abel Blackmar with his wife and youngest son Edwin came in the fall of 1835. Their father, Abel, died March 18, 1843, and their mother February 14, 1861. The family ancestry is from England. Sir Henry Blackmar came to this country and bought about one third of the State of Rhode Island and part of his descendants afterward settled in Connecticut, from which place they removed to Greene county, N. Y. When Ransom and Esbon came to Newark they engaged in general merchandise, buying grain, boat building, and shipping grain on the canal. Their first boat was named the R. & E. Blackmar. The county was settled by eastern people, and when they visited relatives in the east it was customary to go in neighborhood parties, and go with some favorite captain of the boat which they selected and have a good social time, as the forward part of the canal boats were finished in cabins for passengers, the back of the boat for cooking and the accommodation of the crew, and the center for freight. The capacity for grain was about 600 bushels and Albany was the chief market in the east. Colonel Bartle was then doing business in Newark (formerly called Miller's Basin) associated with Mr. Norton of Phelps, under the firm name of Bartle, Norton & Co., who had extensive mills near Phelps and shipped theirfióur at Newark. Most of the farmers who first settled in Arcadia had little means, and usually came with a young wife and children to seek their fortune in what was then known as the far west. They took up land from the land office in Geneva, making small payment, and trusting to their industryjor a future home. The merchants and grain buyers had their nearest banking accommodations at the Geneva Bank at Geneva. and the merchants were the bankers for the farmers, making them loans to pay their interest and payments at the land office, and selling them dry goods and groceries on one year's time until they could plant and harvest crops. The most of the land on which Newark is located is shown by title deeds to have at one time belonged to some member of the Blackmar family, and to Esbon and Horace Blackmar, a cousin and partner in business. is due the surveying, mapping and laying out of many of the streets of our village. Esbon Blackmar was several times supervisor of the town and twice represented the district in the State Legislature, and at one time represented his district as member of Congress; and we will add, was one of the town's honest, honored, efficient and useful citizens. Orrin and Edwin are still doing business in Newark. The enterprise, sterling integrity, and Christian sentiments of the first business men in Newark and the farmers first settling Arcadia are clearly represented in their descendants.

From:
Landmarks of Wayne County, New York
Edited by: Hon. George W. Cowles
Assisted by: H. P. Smith and others
D. Mason & Co., Publishers
Syracuse, N. Y. 1895


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