Biography of Col. Samuel Young
FROM OUR COUNTY AND ITS PEOPLE
A DESCRIPTIVE AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD
OF SARATOGA COUNTY, NEW YORK
PREPARED AND PUBLISHED UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE SARATOGIAN
THE BOSTON HISTORY COMPANY, PUBLISHERS 1899

Search Historical Newspaper Collections

-------------------------------------------



COL. SAMUEL YOUNG.

HERE was a man justly entitled to the term, statesman; one who, although a Democrat of the staunchest type and closely identified with the history of the Democratic party in this State, its organization, progress and triumphs, conducted himself in political circles with such independent honesty and fearlessness in the exposure of party corruption as to win from General Jackson the title, “The Cato of the New York Senate.” Although not a native of this county, having been born in Lenox, Berkshire county, Mass., Saratoga can justly claim him as her own for his parents removed here during his early childhood. He was a farmer’s boy and as such assisted in the farm work during the summer season and attended the common schools in winter. He began his legal studies with Levi H. Palmer, a lawyer of Ballston, in which place he began practice after his admission to the bar; soon winning substantial recognition in a large practice.

He at once became a prominent figure in Democratic politics and served in minor town and village offices. In 1813 he was elected member of assembly and began his long and honorable connection with the politics of the State. Soon after taking his seat a powerful speech, which he made in favor of the war, brought him prominently before the people with whom he was always a great favorite. Governor Tompkins appointed him military aide, hence his title of colonel. In 1815 he served as speaker of the House but, in the election of the same year, was defeated for re-election. This canvass was the origin of the “old line” and “new line” party controversy. In 1816 he was appointed canal commissioner in which capacity he served about twenty years. In 1819 he was elected senator from the Eastern district, and in 1821 was delegate from Saratoga county to the Constitutional Convention, taking a front rank position in this body of able men.

Colonel Young was nominated in 1824 for governor of the State but was defeated by the newly formed “People’s party,” headed by De Witt Clinton, who was elected by a decisive vote. In 1825 he was again elected to the Assembly and chosen speaker. In 1830 he was defeated for member of congress by J. W. Taylor, who received a small majority. In 1833 he was appointed county judge, which office he held for a term of five years, declining reappointment. In 1834 he was elected senator, resigning at the close of the session of 1836; and at the next election was again chosen senator, in which capacity he served until the close of the session of 1840. In 1842 he was elected secretary of state, holding the office until 1845. It was during this period that Colonel Young (by virtue of his office acting superintendent of common schools) laid the foundation of the present excellent system of public instruction of the State of New York, which is in itself a monument to his memory. In 1845 he was again elected to the State Senate, remaining in that body until 1847 when his term expired by force of the new Constitution. This closed his official career, and he retired to his residence in Baliston, where he died November 3, 1850, in the seventy-third year of his age.


Return to [Saratoga County Bio's ] [ Saratoga County History ] [ Online Biographies ]


.Blind Counter

All pages copyright 2009. All items on this site are copyrighted by their author(s). These pages may be linked to but not used on another web site. Anyone may copy and use the information provided here freely for personal use only. Privacy Policy