Biography of Dr. George Seymour
Oneida County, NY Biographies





The name of Dr. George Seymour is engraven ineffaceably on the roll of those whose services in the medical profession were of eminent value to their fellowmen. He continued in general practice throughout his entire life although specializing to some extent in gynecology, and was the loved family physician in many a household in Utica and the surrounding district. Duty was his watchword and added to that there was a deep interest in his fellowmen which prompted his earnest and oft-times self sacrificing effort for those to whom he ministered. He was born in De Ruyter, Madison county, New York, October 5, 1839, while his parents were temporarily residing at that place. He was descended in the paternal line from Norman ancestry, the family, however, being founded in New England at an early period in the colonization of the new world. His grandfather, Silas Seymour, was a native of the state of Connecticut and became the first of the family to remove to New York, settling in West Winfield where he followed the occupation of farming. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Hannah Thompkins, was also a native of Connecticut and was a woman of strong character and useful life.

Their fourth child was David Tompkins Seymour, whose birth occurred in West Winfield, New York, on the 11th of March, 1813. Having arrived at years of maturity he married Hannah Dodge, a daughter of Amasa Dodge, of West Winfield, the wedding being celebrated November 15, 1835. Shortly before the birth of their son George the parents removed to De Ruyter, where they remained for two years, and then established their home in West Winfield, where they resided for seven years. They next became residents of Oswego county, New York, where Mr. Seymour passed away October 5, 1888. He devoted his time and energies to farming, carpentering and mechanical pursuits, possessing much natural ability in the latter direction. For many years he was thus engaged and was recognized as a leader in the business circles of the community. His widow long survived him passing away in 1903.

From early boyhood Dr. Seymour manifested an almost insatiable appetite for learning. He made good use of the opportunities offered by the district schools which he attended until fifteen years of age, and at the age of seventeen he took up the profession of teaching, dividing his time between that work and study in the academies of Pulaski and Mexico, New York, for a period of five years. He concluded his academic studies in Mexico in 1859, when twenty years of age, and for a year thereafter suffered from ill health. At the end of that time he began reading medicine with Dr. F. S. Low, of Pulaski, as his preceptor. He taught school in Ohio for twelve consecutive months while pursuing his studies, devoting only his evenings and his leisure hours to his preparation for the medical profession. In 1862 he was matriculated at the medical college of the University of the City of New York, where he remained until graduated with the class of 1865. He felt that the profession which he had chosen was the one for which taste, inclination and natural talent qualified him, and with deep interest in his work he entered upon active practice. His first professional service came to him on the battle fields of the south. The country was involved in the Civil war when he completed his college training, and he went to the front as acting assistant surgeon, being assigned to duty with the Army of the Potomac. By reason of the close of the war he returned to Pulaski three months later, where he entered into practice with his former preceptor, Dr. Low, while later he practiced independently for four years. On the expiration of that period he succeeded to the practice of Dr. J. N. Lyman, of Mannsville, Jefferson county, where he remained for six years, and he spent one and a half years in New York, giving his attention there largely to postgraduate work in his alma mater.

Dr. Seymour became identified with professional circles in Utica in February, 1879, and remained continuously in practice up to the time of his demise, which occurred November 8, 1909, when he was seventy years of age. The demands made upon his time and energies grew as the years passed by. His ability was widely acknowledged and found its root in his comprehensive understanding of scientific principles which underlie the work, in his careful diagnosis of cases and in his sympathetic understanding of his patients. He always had a cheery word and pleasant smile for those whom he visited, and his presence in a sick room was like a ray of sunshine, heartening and encouraging all. He was the first physician in Utica to introduce anti-toxin into his practice, showing that progressive spirit that was always ready to embrace the latest discoveries of the scientist's laboratories, carefully testing and convincing himself of their worth and efficacy. That he enjoyed the highest respect and confidence of his professional brethren is indicated by the many times that he was honored by his associates. He was made a delegate to the state medical society in 1881 and became a permanent member in 1884. In 1877 he joined the Oneida County Medical Society and remained an active member of the Utica Medical Library Association, of which he was one of the incorporators, until his death His work included much important hospital practice. He had been a resident of Utica for but a short period when he was made physician to the maternity department of St. Elizabeth's Hospital and thus served for two years. For five years he was regular visiting physician to the Faxton Hospital but resigned in 1890 on account of the increasing demands of his private practice. For a long period he was one of the physicians of St. Luke's Hospital, sustaining an active relation as visiting and consulting physician and as lecturer on obstetrics to the School for Nurses connected therewith. He was for several terms a member of the board of health and served one term as special quarantine officer. His contributions to medical literature made him widely known, his articles appearing frequently in the different medical journals, while at various times he read papers before the county and state medical societies. When called upon to speak in any public assemblage he was heard in a most happy vein and in 1891 he was asked to respond to the toast "The Alumni," at the annual alumni dinner of the University of the City of New York. The charming delivery and his graceful, pleasing manner made the speech one of the attractive features on that occasion.

On the 21st of June, 1866, Dr. Seymour was married to Miss Lydia Winegar, of Central Square, Oswego county, and they became the parents of a daughter, Anna. The wife and mother died January 11, 1870, and May 1, 1872, Dr. Seymour wedded Mrs. Sarah B. Kinney, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. T. B. Shepard, of Mannsville, New York, who died June 5, 1907. Dr. Seymour was a member of the First Presbyterian church of Utica, of which he was long a devoted communicant and for many years an elder. Politically he was an ardent defender of the principles of the democratic party His social qualities rendered him popular wherever he was known and assured him of the warm regard of all with whom he was associated. He stood for that which is best in citizenship and his influence was always on the side of right and progress. His own intellectual development made him a valued factor wherever the intelligent men of the city were gathered in the discussion of important problems and questions.

From:
History of Oneida County, New York
From 1700 to the present time
of some of its prominent men and pioneers.
By: Henry J. Cookinham
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company
Chicago 1912


Privacy Policy for OnlineBiographies

NAVIGATION

Oneida County, NY
Biographies

Online
Biographies

New York
Histories

New York
Biographies

Maine
Histories

Pennsylvania
Histories

Pennsylvania
Biographies

For all your genealogy needs visit Linkpendium

Family Tree Maker 2012