Biography of Marshall B. Peck
Oneida County, NY Biographies





MARSHALL BARTON PECK
The student of history cannot carry his investigations far into the records of Oneida county without learning of the close and prominent connection of the Peck family with the leading events which have shaped the records of this part of the state; but long before the family was established in Oneida county, representatives of the name were residents of New England. The ancestry of this family can be traced back for twenty generations in England, prior to 1620. and their coat of arms may be found in the British museum in London. Deacon Paul Peck and his wife Martha, leaving their home in Essex county, England, became passengers on board the Defiance, which sailed from London on the 11th of July, 1634, and established their home in Connecticut, Mr Peck becoming a deacon in the first church organized in Hanford, the first pastor being the Rev. Thomas Hooker.

Zebulon Peck, a representative of the descendants of Paul Peck in the fifth generation, was a captain with the American forces in the Revolutionary war; and was, also, prominent in civic affairs, representing his district in the Connecticut legislature for fourteen sessions. He was, also, a delegate to the convention which met to act upon the adoption of the United States constitution, on which occasion he voted yea. He likewise became well known as the author of a volume entitled the Rise, the Power and Utter Destruction of the Bonapartian Empire. In 1801, he came from Connecticut to Marshall, New York, to join his son Isaac, who arrived in this county in 1797. He is said to have been a remarkable man in many ways, especially noted as a deep thinker and concise writer. The father of Marshall B. Peck was Seth Whitney Peek, who, after arriving at years of maturity, wedded Mary Maria Barton, who was a representative of a family of distinction in England. David Barton, Sr., of Granby, Massachusetts, was an officer of the Revolutionary war and his son, David Barton, was one of the first settlers in the town of Marshall, Oneida county, establishing his home at Hanover, in 1793.

Marshall Barton Peck, whose name introduces this record, pursued his education in the schools of Whitestown, New York, from which he was graduated in 1878, and at Poughkeepsie, where he was graduated in the class of 1880. His entire life was devoted to agricultural pursuits, save that he found time and opportunity for cooperation in public affairs wherein the interests and welfare of the community were involved. For three years, he represented the town of Deansboro on the board of supervisors, and, later, he became a representative of the town of Marshall on the board of supervisors, serving from 1890 until 1894. His record in this connection was most creditable to himself and satisfactory to his constituents, as he advocated various measures and projects which wrought for public good.

On the 11th of October, 1882, in Deausboro, New York, Mr. Peck was united in marriage to Miss Agnes Ruhamah Miller, a daughter of Curtis and Lucy Ann (Jenks) Miller, and a descendent of Benjamin Miller, who on leaving Scotland, in 1650, settled in Massachusetts. The family was founded in America in 1794, when his son, Isaac Miller, became a resident of Hanover. It will thus be seen that both Mr. and Mrs. Peek were representatives of two of the oldest families of the county, and, in both instances, the families have borne important parts in the substantial development and progress of this section of the state. Mr. and Mrs. Peck became the parents of three children: Mollie Lucy, the wife of Walter Barnes Bishopp, of Waterville, New York; Anna Alice, the wife of Richard Gardner Root, of Chicago, Illinois; and Mildred Agnes Peck. The family circle remained unbroken by the hand of death until the 22d of January, 1897, when the husband and father passed away. He was devoted to the welfare of his wife and children, and found his greatest comfort in their happiness. His political allegiance was given to the republican party, and his religions faith was that of the Congregational church, to which he closely adhered. All who knew him entertained for him genuine regard, because of his loyalty to duty and his devotion to all those principles which are most commendable in the life of man.

From:
History of Oneida County, New York
From 1700 to the present time
of some of its prominent men and pioneers.
By: Henry J. Cookinham
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company
Chicago 1912


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