Biography of George M. Hubbard
Oneida County, NY Biographies





Especially interesting will be found the record of George M. Hubbard as showing the value of industry, determined effort and perseverance in the attainment of success, for it has been entirely through the exercise of these qualities that he has forged his way upward in the business world from a humble position to that of one among the rich men of Watervifie. He was born in Butler, near Wolcott, Wayne county, New York, on the 13th of August, 1822, and although he has almost reached the ninetieth milestone on life's journey, is remarkably well preserved and is as actjve as many men twenty years his junior. Simon Hubbard, his grandfather, was born in Massachusetts and was one of the pioneer settlers of Oneida county, coming to this district in 1790. Here he entered a tract of land consisting of one hundred and thirty acres which has remained in the possession of the family, being now the property of George M. Hubbard. The tract is located three miles north of Waterville, on the road to Paris Hill, and there Simon ilubbard passed away. Later his widow removed to Wolcott, where her death occurred, her remains being brought back to the homestead, upon which all of the members of the family who have passed away are buried. In their family were three daughters and two sons, Oris, Maximus, Charlotte, Bethiah and Martha. Maximus Hubbard, the father of George M. Hubbard, was born in Oneida county but accompanied his mother on her removal to Wolcott, Wayne county, where he resided for many years. After the death of his wife, which occurred when our subject was but a year old, he returned to this county and here passed his remaining days. His wife bore the maiden name of Zylphia Sylvester and was born in Oneida county.

George M. Hubbard continued to reside with his father until twenty one years of age and in the meantime assisted in the work of the farm during the summer months, while the winter seasons were devoted to acquiring an education in the district schools. Later he had the benefit of a course of study in the select school, equivalent to a high school course, and thus he was well equipped by mental and practical training for life's responsible duties. Upon attaining his majority he decided to leave home and seek his fortune in other fields. This course was greatly against the wishes of his father, but the lad was desirous of seeing something of the world and longed for larger opportunities than those offered by the home life. Consequently he left the farm and, borrowing two hundred dollars from a cousin, joined Jacob Butterfield, of Wolcott, in the purchase of a canal boat with which they engaged in water pursuits on the canal for a time. They only paid four hundred dollars down on the boat, but soon they were able to meet their entire obligations. He sold out after a few months, but in the interval he and his partner had been unusually successful, making one thousand dollars the first trip, which covered twenty days, a very good sum for those days. After severing his connections with the boating business he traveled extensively throughout almost all of the various states of the Union. This not only gratified to a certain extent the spirit of adventure which was strong within him, but also proved a liberal source of education to him along many lines, extending the outlook of his life and bringing to him broad general information. Upon returning to the east he became identified with distilling business, with which he was successfully connected for many years. At one time he operated a distillery at Warsaw, Illinois, for a few months, and also at Boston, Massachusetts, at which place he was engaged in the manufacture of rum. He later owned a distillery at Deansboro and also erected one at Oswego, and in the conduct of his business here employed regularly on an average of twenty five men. He devoted a large portion of his attention to the manufacture of alcohol although at one time he dealt extensively in hops, purchasing this product in California, Wisconsin and New York. At one time it seemed as though he would suffer the loss of all of his money, for at the time of the great fire in Chicago in 1871 he had all of his hops consigned to Chicago and that consignment represented his entire capital. As the years came and went he proved eminently successful in his undertakings and at length was able to withdraw from active business life. For the past fifteen years he has given his entire attention to the supervision of his financial interests in Waterville. He is the owner of much valuable laud and at one time was also proprietor of a coal and mill business. He is the owner of the Hubbard block, which he remodeled and which is now one of the fine business blocks of this community. He owns a beautiful home on White street which he erected in 1872, and there resides with his family.

Mr. Hubbard was married, in 1861, to Miss Myra Scott, who was born at Bridgewater, New York, a daughter of Garrett Scott, and unto them were born two daughters: Florence, who passed away at the age of eighteen months; and Helen, who married H. M. King, who is mentioned elsewhere in this volume.

Mr. Hubbard has been an active factor in democratic circles in Oneida county, although he has never desired nor sought public office in return for party fealty, and is also well known in fraternal circles. He attained the thirty second degree in Masonry but now holds a demit. He also belonged to the Knight Templars and in fact was identified with almost all of the various fraternal orders at one time but has withdrawn active connection therewith. Mr. Hubbard is now one of the oldest residents of Oneida county and during the many years in which he has made his home within her borders has met and has been personally acquainted with ahnost all of the large number of men of national and international reputation whom this county has produced. Of a genial, social disposition, he is popular with all who have been associated with him either in business or private life, and not to know George M. Hubbard is almost to argue oneself unknown.

From:
History of Oneida County, New York
From 1700 to the present time
of some of its prominent men and pioneers.
By: Henry J. Cookinham
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company
Chicago 1912


Privacy Policy for OnlineBiographies

NAVIGATION

Oneida County, NY
Biographies

Online
Biographies

New York
Histories

New York
Biographies

Maine
Histories

Pennsylvania
Histories

Pennsylvania
Biographies

For all your genealogy needs visit Linkpendium

Family Tree Maker 2012