Biography of George Daiker
Oneida County, NY Biographies





Some men are born with talents which lead them to success in anything they undertake and to this class belongs George Daiker who is now making his home in Utica. He is a native of Germany, born in 1844, a son of John A. and Elizabeth (Streibling) Daiker. The father engaged in the mercantile business, sold baked goods, and conducted a hotel, thus making an honest and comfortable living for his family.

George Daiker grew to maturity under the shelter of a kindly home and in the public schools secured the foundation of an education which he has greatly widened by reading, observation and travel. At the age of nineteen he crossed the ocean to America, landing in New York city. Under his grandfather in the old country he had learned the trade of cabinetmaker which he mastered in all its details and he readily found employment in New York. Subsequently he engaged in business on his own account as a manufacturer of fine furniture. He was the first man to introduce machines in America for the manufacture of fine furniture, all work of this character having previously been done on this side of the Atlantic by hand. For twenty years he engaged in the business under the title of George Daiker, Manufacturer of Parlor Furniture, and sold the products of his factory in all of the leading cities of the country and as far west as the Pacific coast. In the earlier years of his experience as a manufacturer he shipped considerable furniture by water around Cape Horn to San Francisco. After conducting his business with remarkable success for twenty years he turned it over to his foreman and retired, traveling in various parts of the west and visiting a brother-in-law in Kansas. He also made a trip to his native land and while in Europe visited the principal cities and objects of interest on the continent. Upon returning to America he found his time hanging heavily upon his hands and accordingly engaged in building in New York city, erecting a number of beautiful stone and brick private residences which he disposed of to good advantage and also dealing extensively in real estate. He again retired for several years but once more was attracted to business pursuits and erected large apartment houses in various parts of New York city, among them the Majestic apartment house, one of the thiest buildings of the kind in the world, containing ample aceothmodatjons for one hundred and fifty families. He had charge of this house until recently when he sold it to the president of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company. He gained an enviable reputation for energy, honesty and square dealing. He always paid cash for everything and no man in New York city stood higher in the opinion of investors or of those with whom he had business dealings. Four years ago he came to Utica and while enjoying a. ride on Genesee street his eye caught sight of the old General John Butterfield homestead. He made an offer for the property which was accepted and he has converted it into one of the most desirable homes of the city. He also acquired a valuable tract of land and has laid out. a number of building lots, dedicating a portion of it for a boulevard which will greatly improve the appearance of that part of the city.

In 1875 Mr. Daiker was married in New York city to Miss Mina Holzer, who was born in Germany, and three children came to bless this union: Minnie; George, who was the engineer on the apartment buildings erected by his father; and Herbert, who is now a high school pupil.

Politically Mr. Daiker gives his support to the republican party and his religious faith is indicated by membership in the Fortieth Street Dutch Reformed church. For seven years he was a member of Battery K, New York State Militia, and took a great interest in that organization. Starting as a young man in a strange country, he totk advantage of opportunities as they were presented and by good judgment and application of sound business principles gained a position of leadership so greatly desired by all ambitious young men. He has never sought to profit through the necessities of others and has always endeavored to return full value for money received. He belongs among those who improve and beautify their surroundings and leave the world more attractive than they found it. To such men modern civilization owes a debt of gratitude which it would be difficult to pay and Mr. Daiker and men of his type may therefore be truly named as benefactors of the race. He has a host of friends who wish that he may live many years and continue the good work in which he has so successfully engaged.

From:
History of Oneida County, New York
From 1700 to the present time
of some of its prominent men and pioneers.
By: Henry J. Cookinham
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company
Chicago 1912


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