Biography of Joseph R. Flanders
Franklin County, NY Biographies





Joseph R. Flanders, a brother of Francis D., was born at Salisbury, N. H., in 1814. His home was in Fort Covington from about 1825 until 1847, when he removed to Malone. He was admitted to the bar at an early age, and in his spare hours did a good deal of writing for the Gazette, in which his articles usually appeared as editorials. He was scholarly, a finished and forceful writer, and especially delighted in discussion of constitutional principles. He was a delegate to the convention of 1846 to revise the State constitution, was member of Assembly in 1847, and the same year was elected county judge. In the factional strife which divided the Democratic party in 1848 and for a few years thereafter, he and Francis D. disagreed, and Joseph R. established in 1853 and, for two years edited the Jeffersonian at Malone to urge his opinions and to represent the uncompromising or hunker wing of Democracy. It goes without saying that the Jeffersonian was exceptionally able and vigorous in its utterances, but it was discontinued when Mr. Flanders removed to New York city in 1885 to re engage in the practice of the law, of which profession he was a notably strong and reputable exponent. He also was confined at Fort Lafayette and Fort Warren for a few weeks during the civil war. He returned to Malone in 1864 to become counsel for the O. & L. C. R. R. Co., but soon afterward went to La Crosse, Wis., to engage in editorial work on "Brick" Pomeroy's once famous and widely circulated Democrat. In 1868 he located again in New York city, where he conthrned in the practice of the law until his health failed in 188G. Mr. Flanders was one of the strongest men intellectually that ever lived in Franklin county, a forceful and captivating speaker, a man of intense and uncompromising convietions, and of high character. He died at Richmond Hill, Long Island, November 5, 1886. There is a legend in the fami]y that during a war, centuries ago, between England and Flanders (now a part of Belgium) soldiers from Salisbury, England, picked up a baby boy on a battle field, and, unable to find his parents or to learn anything about him. took him home with them, and named him Flanders from the fact that he was found there. This boy is said to have been the ancestor of all the Flanders in England and the United States.

From:
Historical Sketches of Franklin County
and its several towns.
By: Frederick J. Seaver Malone, New York.
J. B. Lyon Company, Printers Albany, NY 1918.


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