Biography of Frank D. March
Bronx County, NY Biographies





FRANK D. MARCH - Of the present day institutions for training boys and girls in commercial education, none has a higher rating in Greater New York than the Drake Business School. The first Drake School was founded nearly half a century ago in Newark, New Jersey. In 1907, a Drake School was opened in New York City, on the tenth floor of the Tribune Building, where it still continues, and has grown to be one of the largest business schools in the entire Metropolitan district. There are now twenty three Drake Business Schools located in various cities of New York and New Jersey and four branches in Europe. All these schools are large and flourishing, ranking among the highest grade commercial schools in their respective cities. One of the strong links in this great chain of Drake Schools is the Bronx school, opened in 1922, in the splendid fireproof Keith Building on East Fordham Road, one of the best locations in Bronx Borough. This school, presided over by Frank D. March, as principal manager, at once became a magnet for students in The Bronx, under the powerful impulse of Drake management. Since it opened it has graduated over 1,800 students. The number of enrollments is increasing each year. The Bronx school now has approximately two hundred and fifty day and one hundred and fifty night students. The classrooms are large, light and airy, of ideal cheeriness and healthfulness, and the school is easy of access from every part of The Bronx as well as lower Westchester and Washington Heights.

There is a superiority in Drake methods of education and Drake School policy toward its patrons. This superiority has produced the wonderful growth. Theory and practice are the Drake School ideas in business training. The first thought is to see that the student secures a broad training that is also practical. Modern office appliances and equipment are installed in every school. Individual instruction is an outstanding feature. The teaching staff has been selected for the actual, practical business experience of its members, and their ability to impart that information to others. The school is interested in the subsequent as well as the present success of its pupils. It gives vocational guidance. Not only that but it guarantees positions in the business world for its graduates, and its officers are in a position to carry out that guarantee. Drake students have won more than two hundred and fifty cups, prizes and medals, in amateur and professional typewriting contests, in penmanship, shorthand and stenography. In typewriting Drake students have won American, Canadian and International amateur and professional speed contests and accuracy records, and among 10,000 contestants representing two hundred schools a Drake boy was named American champion student penman the unanimous choice of the judges.

The Bronx school is celebrated among the Drake Schools for its social atmosphere. All of the students have been brought together in sort of one great family. The Bronx school boasts of a literary society, holds an annual dance, has its athletic teams and participates in every variety of indoor and outdoor sports and track meets, conducts an educational club, and publishes the "Drake School News," edited by the students and alumni of the school. The Drake methods are not an experiment They have met the demands of business men throughout a long period of years. They are thorough, concise, up to date, and every year has seen an increasing demand for Drake graduates. But a school cannot prosper through methods and business men's demands alone; it must be supplemented by efficient management. In this latter the Bronx school has been called fortunate in having for principal manager Mr. March, an aggressive, interested and competent school man, and one who knows from actual contact what the office requires. He is known as the friend and adviser as well as a teacher of the students of the Bronx school. The courses given are business training, office practice, business English stenography (both Gregg and Pitman), typewriting, bookkeeping, accountancy, Spanish, drafting, and French stenography, salesmanship, advertising and secretarial studies. The school maintains its own employment bureau. The tuition fees are moderate.

Frank D. March, son of Dominick and Mary March, was born in New York City, February 17, 1900. His father, now retired, came from Italy as a boy. The son worked while going through the public schools successively as an office boy, stenographer, salesman, and then as tour conductor with Thomas Cook & Son, specializing in Bermuda tours. He has the distinction of being the youngest of the Drake School principals. He heads the Drake School Literary Society, and conducts a column in the "Drake School News," of which he is editorin chief. He has also served as a member of the editorial staff of the "Fordham Bulletin." He is a member of the Field Artillery Reserve of the United States Army. He holds membership in the Unity Council of the Knights of Columbus, The Bronx Lions Club, Mott Avenue Community Club, and he is a communicant of the Church of St. Nicholas of Tolentine, in The Bronx. He was formerly secretary of the Fordham Merchants' Association, and served on the celebration committee at the opening of the Grand Concourse. He is also a member of The Bronx Board of Trade, and aside from his professional duties displays at all times a fine sense of civic duty. He is unmarried.

From:
The Bronx and its people
A History 1609-1927
Board of Editors: James L. Wells,
Louis F. Haffen
Josiah A. Briggs.
Historian: Benedict Fitspatrick
Publisher: The Lewis Historical Publishing Co., Inc.
New York 1927


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