Biography of Joel T. Livingston
Jasper County, MO Biographies





Joel T. Livingston, ex-city attorney of Joplin, was born in Lawrence, Kansas, in 1867. His father, Chancellor Livingston, was a native of the Empire state, his birth having occurred there in 183o. During his childhood he was taken to Ohio, where he was reared, and later became prominently identified with business interests and public affairs in Kansas. He engaged in dealing in stock in Lawrence, carrying on a large and profitable business. During the Civil war he was a victim of the Quantrell raid. His property was destroyed by that band of men and he was shot, from the effects of which he never fully recovered. In 1876 he came to Joplin, and in many ways left the impress of his individuality for good upon the public affairs of the city. In 1887 he was elected mayor and served for eighteen months, his administration being business like and progressive. He was also a member of the city council at one time, and in 1884 was a candidate on the Greenback Republican ticket for the state legislature and two years later for the position of judge of the western district of the county court. He ever discharged his public duties with promptness and fidelity, and his worth as a valued citizen was widely acknowledged. His death occurred in 1892, when he was sixty two years of age, and a large circle of acquaintance mourned his loss. His wife bore the maiden name of Mary A. Lutes, and was a native of Luzerne county, Pennsylvania, living in the Wyoming valley, where occurred the terrible Indian massacre at the time of the Revolutionary war.

In taking up the personal history of Joel T. Livingston we present to our readers the life record of one who is widely and favorably known in Joplin and Jasper county, for he was only nine years of age when he was brought by his parents to this locality, which has since been his home. After completing the public school course he entered Drury College, at Springfield, Missouri, and thus gained a broad general knowledge to serve as. a foundation upon which to rear them Superstructure of his professional learning. He engaged in teaching school for some time before entering upon the practice of law, being principal of the Franklin school of Joplin for six years. An able educator, he won prominence in the ranks of that profession by reason of his marked ability, which was manifest through the progress made by those who came under his instruction. Going to Washington, D. C., he completed his law course in Columbia Law College, and in 1896 was admitted to the bar in Missouri. He is well versed in the principles of jurisprudence and his careful preparation of his cases and his devotion to his clients interests are proverbial. In 1897 he was elected city attorney of Joplin for a term of two years, and discharged his duties so capably that he was reelected in 1899 for a second term. His first political affiliations were with the Republican party, but being an advocate of the free coinage of silver he cast his lot with the Democratic party in 1896.

Mr. Livingston is quite prominent in military circles, is well versed in military tactics and manouvers, and for several years has been a members of the Missouri National Guard. In 1893 he joined the Second Regiment and was made captain of Company G. He had a splendidly drilled organization and enjoyed the respect and high regard of his men. He also organized in the schools of Joplin a cadet corps, which was so well drilled that it was, high complimented by Governor David R. Francis on the occasion of a visit to Joplin in 1892. Mr. Livingston has recently been appointed lieutenant colonel on the staff of Governor Dockery. Socially he is connected. with the Modern Woodmen of America and with the Masonic order, being a member of Joplin Lodge, No. 335. A. F. & A. M., of which he is master. He is also a member of the chapter and Joplin Commandery, K. T. He is past chancellor of Joplin Lodge, No. 40, K. P., in which he has served as a representative to the grand lodge on three occasions. He is an attendant on the services of the Presbyterian church, and has been a member of the choir here and also in Washington, having considerable musical talent, which makes him a valued factor in musical circles. Hem belongs to the Young Men's Christian Association and takes an active interest in furthering its work.

On the 4th of June, 1901, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Livingston and Miss Lenora Henley, a granddaughter of J. A. Shepherd, one of the old, influential and highly respected citizens of Joplin. Mrs. Livingston is a beautiful and accomplished lady, being a petite blonde with decidedly literary turn of mind. She is an active member of the Presbyterian church and a club woman. She is a social favorite and adds materially to Mr. Livingston's popularity. Mr. Livingston is a young man of strong character and forceful individuality, of laudable ambition, enterprise and energy and of high ideals and principles, and in his profession will no doubt win promotion and success, and at the Jame time will ever command the esteem and regard of those with whom he is associated.

From:
The Biographical History of Jasper County, Missouri
By Hon. Malcolm G. McGregor
The Lewis Publishing Co.
Chiago 1901


Privacy Policy for OnlineBiographies

NAVIGATION

Jasper County, MO
Biographies

Online
Biographies

New York
Histories

New York
Biographies

Maine
Histories

Pennsylvania
Histories

Pennsylvania
Biographies

For all your genealogy needs visit Linkpendium