Biography of Charles Kimble

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CHARLES KIMBLE was born in Connecticut, where his father resided until his emigration at an early day to Wayne Co., Pa.; he being among the first to settle in this part of the State. His father, Walter, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war prior to his settlement. After locating in Pennsylvania, the Indians becoming hostile towards the whites, Mr. Kimble was compelled to leave his home about the time of the Wyoming massacre. After peace was made he again returned to his home and made a permanent settlement. On this farm Charles grew to manhood. Arrived at majority, he started in life for himself, adopting farming as a calling. He became a prominent man, and was widely known as a successful farmer. In 1836 he sold his farm; and in the spring of 1837, with his wife and six children, came with a team and wagon to Michigan, being twenty-one days on the road. They reached Brady township, in Kalamazoo County, on the 4th of July, 1837, and located on the farm now owned by his son Lewis. It was on the Indian reservation and was not then in the market, and Mr. Kimble became "a squatter." He built a log house and commenced to improve his farm. In 1838 the pre-emption law was passed, and Mr. Kimble established his claim, and Oct. 10, 1840, received a deed for a quartersection, on which he remained until his death, which occurred Nov. 20, 1852. The obituary notice published of him said, "There are many singular incidents connected with the history of Mr. Kimble, as well as interesting traditional events handed down to the present geheration by his social and familiar character. All the hardships and trials consequent to an early settlement in a remote wilderness, surrounded by wild beasts hungering for prey and by savage tribes remembering the white man's aggressions, were a part of his experience, and the subject of his frequent tales to the grandchildren upon his knee. He was liberal to a fault, open-hearted in all things, and never failed to impress upon the minds of all who knew him his integrity and kindness of heart."


FROM:
History of Kalamazoo County, Michigan
With Illistrations and Biographical Sketches
of its Men and Pioneers.
Everts & Abbott., Philadelphia 1880
Press of J. B. Lippincott & Co., Philadelphia.

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