Biography of Isaac T. Tice
Cass County, MI Biographies

NAVIGATION

Michigan
Histories

Cass County
Biographies

Online Biographies

Illinois
Histories

Also see [Railway Officials in America 1906]

Isaac T. Tice, for many years a resident of Silver Creek Township, was born in Pine Bush, Orange County, N. Y., August 2, 1796. His father, Henry Tice, wan of German birth and parentage and came to this oountry when a child. But little is known of his history further than that he was a soldier in the war of 1812. He reared a family of eleven children, Isaac T. being the seventh son.

Isaac was thrown upon his own resources at an early age, and in his boyhood learned in the bitter school of experience those lessons of economy and perseverance that afterward became the salient points in his character. He acquired the trade of a blacksmith, which avocation he followed in Orange County until 1821, at which time he was married to Miss Sarah, a daughter of Samuel Lockwood, one of the esteemed citizens of Pine Bush. Shortly after his marriage, he removed to New York City. There he followed his trade until his removal to Albany in 1829, where, for nany years, he prosecuted a successful business in the manufacture of iron doors, railings, bank vaults, locks, etc. About 1844, he purchased of Erastus Corning, of Albany, a large tract of land in Cass and Berrien Counties, to which he removed with his family in 1851, settling in Silver Creek, near Indian Lake, where he resided until his removal to Dowagiac in 1871, where he died in June of the following year. Mrs. Tice, who was born in 1808, died in Silver Creek in 1855. She was an estimable woman, and the mother of ten children— Samuel, William, Mary, Almera, Isaac, Joseph, Charles, Margaret, Myron and Susan—all but two are now living. In 1856, Mr. Tice was again married to Sarah A., daughter of Moses and Sarah Duncombe, of Van Buren County. She was born in Canada in 1820. By this marriage there was one son, Talmadge, now residing in Dowagiac.

Mr. Tice was emphatically a man of affairs, and by a long life of industry, economy and honorable dealing accumulated a fine competency. In his religious belief he was at one time a Presbyterian, but later in life became an Adventist, in which faith he died.


From:
History of Cass Couny, Michigan
With Illistrations and Biographical Sketches
of some of it's Prominent Men and Pioneers.
Waterman, Watkins & Co., Chicago 1882.

Privacy Policy for OnlineBiographies Counter

Counter