Biography of J. M. Amos
Rush County, IN Biographies





J. M. AMOS was born on the farm upon which he now lives in Noble township, March 4, 1854, and has ever maintained the standards there set in their respective generations by his father and his grandfather, thus projecting the usefulness of his family into a later and more progressive period. Mr. Amos is a grandson of Joseph J. Amos, who came to Rush county about 1822 and entered land near where Milroy came to be located, proved up on it and then returned to his native Kentucky, where he engaged in the mercantile business at Ruddles Mills. A strong anti slavery man, in 1842 he decided to leave a community which countenanced the purchase and sale of human beings, and accordingly returned to Indiana and settled in Rush county, purchasing the farm in Noble township that is now the property of his grandson, on which he lived until his death in 1890, when he was eighty six years of age. Through business ability, wise investment and a shrewd appreciation of values, he became one of the leading landholders in the county, and at one time owned 2,200 acres. A man of education, he gave thought and study to the serious things of life, and was one of the active members and liberal supporters of the Methodist Protestant church, and assisted to build several houses of worship of that denomination in this community. He was likewise a great friend of education and endowed a chair at Adrian (Mich.) Normal School, for $22,500. Mr. Amos was the father of four chilthen: Johanan, Van Buren, Aeretta and Mary. J. Amos, father of J. M. Amos, was about fifteen years of age when brought from his native Bourbon county, Kentucky, to Rush county, in 1842, and here he completed his schooling in the district schools. As a young man he engaged in farming, but was more interested in trading and gradually developed into one of the leading traders in mules in the county, particularly during the Civil war. With a promising career before him, he was called by death when still a comparatively young man, in his thirty seventh year, January 16, 1864. Mr. Amos married Amanda Hildreth, also a native of Bourbon county, Kentucky, and they became the parents of five children: Iaffard Kossuth. Johanan Mazzini, Willard Hildreth, Anna Rebecca and Joseph J. J. M. Amos received his education in the district schools of Noble township, after leaving which he took up farming on the home place, where he has always resided and operated as a general farmer and grower of live stock, He is now the owner of 606 acres, in Rushville and Noble townships, the improvements on which are all of his own building. He and his son, William, who is his associate, feed about 700 hogs annually, and raise about 200 acres of corn and 175 acres of wheat. His modern hnprovements include three sets of buildings and the latest and most highly approved machinery of every kind. During the heyday of horseracing in this country, Mr. Amos gained much more than a local reputation as a breeder of fast horses, and bred and owned thirty horses that had a record of better than 2:30. Among these was "Legal Tender," a pacer, 2:27, and sire of "Alhambra." 2:08 1/4, the fastest horse ever bred in Rush county, which paced a quarter of a mile in 27 seconds. Mr. Amos is one of the liberalminded and progressive men of his community, has various other interests aside from his farm, and is a director of the Cooperative Telephone Company, of Rushville, and of the Rushville National Bank. He is a Republican, and a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He has always demonstrated his willingness to discharge the duties of good citizenship and for three years served in the capacity of county ditch commissioner. On December 23, 1873, Mr. Amos married Estella J. Poston, daughter of George W. and Nancy (MeNeal) Poston, and to this union there have been born five children: William M., who married Mildred Moore and has four children, Elizabeth, Anna Louise, Robert and Margaret; Ethel, who married George Nieoll and has two children, David Amos and William; Luella, who married Albert Capp and has two children, Ellen and Fred; Georgia, who married George Donley, and Clorine, who married J. Kennard Allen.

From:
Centennian History of Rush County, Indiana
Edited by: A. L. Gary and E. B. Thomas
Historical Publishing Company
Indianapolis 1921


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