Biography of James Curdles
Howard County, IN Biographies





JAMES CURDLES was born January 13, 1839, and is the son of Samuel and Hannah A. (Brown) Curles natives of New Jersey, and of English descent. Mr. Samuel Curies located in Brown County, Ohio, about the year 1818, and was there married to Hannah A. Brown, daughter of William Brown, of New Jersey, and of English descent. By this marriage, he obtained a small farm, which he shortly increased to 125 acres, and in 1857 added 150 acres more, making in all 275 acres, on which he still lives. Mr. and Mrs. Curies had thirteen children - William, Nancy J., Asher, James, Elizabeth, Mahala, Joseph, Marion, Sarah F., Randolph, Hannah A., Mary and John, seven of whom are yet living. Mrs. Curies died in the fall of 1862, a prominent member of the United Brethren Church. Mr. Curles having the care of a large family, married, in the spring of 1864, Mary Fednick, to which union were added eleven children, all of whom are now living. Mr. Curles has been an active politician, voting in an early day with the Whig party, and subsequently with the Republican. He is a member of the United Brethren Church, and his wife is identified with the Methodist Episcopal Church. James Curles was reared on the farm, and at the age of eighteen, attended the National Normal School of Lebanon, Ohio, for one term, after which he spent two years on the farm. He subsequently returned to Lebanon, and later taught several terms of school. On New Year's Day, 1862, he enlisted, in Company I, Sixtieth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, or the one year regiment, and was mustered in at Fayetteville. He was placed under Gen. J. C. Fremont, and was ordered to follow closely Gen. Jackson, and after about seven days' forced march, arrived at Franklin, Va. Here he was taken sick, and lay in his tent about four weeks, and was then taken to New Creek Station, where he was placed in a hospital. He remained there until July 4, when he was taken home to Ohio, by his father. The 1st of October, he went to Columbus, Ohio, and reported, and was sent to rejoin his regiment, which was stationed at Chicago, on account of the Indian trouble, but this subsiding they were discharged. Mr. Curles, in December, 1862, engaged in the mercantile business in Fayetteville, which he continued one year, and April 16, 1863, he was married to Clorinda Covalt, daughter of Cheniah and Deborah (Jones) Covalt, of Ohio, and of English descent. The following winter, he disposed of his stock, and taught in Fayetteville, and the fall of 1864, in company with his father in law, came to Union Township, Howard County, and engaged in business at West Liberty, with a stock of $3,000, under the firm name of Covalt & Curles. After remaining there ten years, they traded their store for sixty acres, two miles southeast of West Liberty, and Mr. Curles lived on this farm until the fall of 1881, when he purchased a lot of five acres, upon which he built one of the finest residences in the village. Mr. Curles, upon the death of his father in law, in the fall of 1882, again engaged in the goods business, in which he has now a large and increasing trade. Mr. and Mrs. Curles have had five children, three of whom - Stella D., Demma M. and Eddison D. are still living. Mr. Curles is an active politician in the Republican party, and cast his first vote for President Lincoln, in 1860. He and his wife are identified with the Methodist Episcopal Church, and are among its most active members.

From:
Counties of Howard and Tipton, Indiana
Historical and Biographical
Charles Blanchard, Editor
F. A. Bettey & Co.
Chicago 1883.


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