Biography of Hon. Chales R. Pollard
Carroll County, IN Biographies





HON. CHARLES R. POLLARD.

In the largest and best sense of the term, Charles R. Pollard is distinctively one of the notable men of his day in Indiana, his reputation extending far beyond the bounds of his county and state; therefore his life record is entitled to a conspicuous place in the annals of his county. It is scarce less than supererogation in outlining the leading facts in this life to refer to him as a lawyer in the ordinary phraseology which meets requirements when dealing with the average member of the legal profession. A master of his profession, he has for many years been a leader among men distinguished for the high order of their legal talent, and has been identified as counsel with many of the most important caees tried in the courts of the middle West.

Charles R. Pollard was born on August 9, 1845, in the city of Mobile, Alabama, and is a son of Robert and Lydia (Garrett) Pollard, the former a native of Virginia and the latter of Ireland. Robert Pollard died when the subject of this review was but twelve years old. Charles R. Pollard received his education in the common schools of Mobile and the State University of Alabama, at Tuscaloosa. In November, 1865, with his mother, two sisters and a brother, he came to Delphi, Indiana, where he entered the employ of his uncle, Dr. Anthony Garrett, in the county clerk's office. Soon afterward he took up the study of law and, in January, 1869, he was admitted to the Carroll county bar. For several years he was associated in the practice with Hon. Barnard B. Daily, and then maintained a partnership with Judson Applegate until the latter moved to the state of Washington, about twenty years ago, since which time Mr. Pollard has remained alone in the practice. For over two decades he has had his office in the Centennial block; Delphi, and possesses the largest and most complete law library in the city, numbering over three thousand volumes.

Mr. Pollard commands a large practice in Indiana and other states, and is widely known as a successful criminal lawyer, having appeared' for either the prosecution or defense in twenty eight murder cases alone, besides many others of scarcely less importance. A few of the most important of these cases are the following: Associated in the prosecution of W. H. Lee, charged with the murder of Benjamin Tea in Tippecanoe county, resulting in conviction and a life sentence for the defendant; defended Minnie Babbitt, of Marion county, on a charge of murdering her child, the trial resulting in acquittal; her two brothers, charged as accomplices, took a change of venue to Boone county, where they were acquitted; assisted the state in the trial of Brooks and Can, charged with the murder of Slater in Cass county; the case was brought to Carroll county on a change of venue and the trial resulted in conviction, Brooks being hung and Can receiving a life sentence; in this case, which occurred in 1871, Senator David Turpie was attorney for the defendants. Mr. Pollard was associated with Daniel W. Voorhees, at Annapolis, Maryland, in the defense of Johnson, charged with the killing of his wife, and secured an acquittal. In the case of Alexander Keys, charged with the killing of his father-in-law, Benjamin Stewart, at Flora, and which case was venued to Tippecanoe county, Mr. Pollard assisted in the prosecution and secured a conviction, the defendant receiving a life sentence. Mr. Pollard defended Riley Mullendore, who was charged with the first degree murder of Grover C. Cook in Tippecanoe county in 1913. In the trial in that county, the jury disagreed and the vase was sent to Carroll county on a change of venue and tried there in January, 1915. After a bitterly contested trial, which lasted six weeks, the defendant was acquitted. In his long and busy career as a lawyer, Mr. Pollard has exhibited a weight of character, a native sagacity, a far seeing judgment and a fidelity of purpose that has commanded the respect of all. Indomitable perseverance has been one of the keynotes to his success, and yet, hard fighter as he has been, he has always adhered so closely to the professional code of ethics that he has enjoyed the fullest confidence of his brethren at the bar.

In 1873 Governor Thomas A. Hendricks appointed Mr. Pollard prosecuting attorney for the eleventh judicial circuit, comprising Cass and Carroll counties, and in the following year he was elected to that office. During President Cleveland's first administration Mr. Pollard was appointed judge of the federal court of Montana. In 1888 he was the delegate from the ninth congressional district to the Democratic national, convention, which renominated Mr. Cleveland for the presidency. Judge Pollard served a number of years as county attorney and city attorney, and rendered efficiept service to his community in these capacities.

In 1869 judge Pollard. married Lillie M. Pigman, the daughter of G. W. Pigman, and to them were born three children, two sons, George and William, deceased, and Mrs. Mabel Isherwood, of Lafayette.

Politically, Judge Pollard has given his earnest support to the Democratic party and has been influential in the councils of that organization. Unostentatious, open hearted and candid in manner, the judge has, nevertheless, made a definite impress on the life of the community and has contributed to its progress and development.

From:
History of Carroll County, Indiana
Its People, Industries and Institutions
By: John C. Odell
B. F. Bowen & Company
Indianapolis 1916


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