Biography of Hiram Holmes

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Hiram Holmes, deceased, was born March 9, 1809, in Kingston, Mass., a descendant of the old Puritan stock who came over in the Mayflower. He was a son of Charles and Rebecca (Briggs) Holmes, the former a native of Kingston, Mass., arid the latter a native of Halifax, Mass. He received a liberal education, and after leaving the academy at Bridgewater. Mass., he taught school several terms in Massachusetts. He then began the study of medicine, but on coming West, in 1830, he took up surveying, and acted as agent for parties who were buying land in the State of Illinois. At the breaking out of the Black Hawk war he volunteered as a private soldier, but was soon promoted and served during the war as Sergeant and Adjutant. He first came to La Salle in pursuit of the enemy, and assisted in the construction of a fort near where the city now stands. He built a large flour-mill at Audabon, now Pana, near Hillsboro, where he married, in 1842, Beulah Prentice Tufts, of Charlestown, Mass., a teacher in the Hillsboro Academy. He was so favorably impressed with La Salle County that he located in Eden Township in 1844, where he served as Justice of the Peace several years, till his wife's death in 1853. She left three children - Hiram, born at Hillsboro in 1844, married Emma Foster, and resides in La Salle City; Beulah, married Captain J. A. Lee and resides in Topeka, Kan., and Horace, married and living in Detroit, Mich. Mr. Holmes was again married in 1855 to Mrs. Sarah E. Gilbert, born in Gloucester, Mass., a daughter of Captain William H. Dolliver, and to this union were born three children - Edward D., a resident of Dakota; George B., on the homestead, and Anna. After his second marriage he settled at Peru, remaining there five years. Having purchased land immediately south of La Salle, he removed his family there in the summer of 1860 where he followed farming till his death in November, 1874. He was esteemed by a large circle of friends, endearing himself to all by his kind and courteous manner. He was a staunch temperance man till his death. He left a farm of 160 acres of valuable land which is underlaid with the best of coal. Mrs. Holmes and her son George carry on the farm.


FROM:
History of La Salle County, Illinois
Inter-State Publishing Co.
Chicago 1886