Biography of Nathan Starr Carrington

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NATHAN STARR CARRINGTON, farmer, P. 0. Hinadale, DuPage County, was born in Middletown, Conn., December 12, 1816, son of Henry and Susan (starr) Carrington. The father was born in March, 1781, son of Edward and Susan (Wittlesy) Carrington; the mother was born in April, 1782, daughter of Nathan and Folly (Pomeroy) Starr; they were married in January, t8o6, and had seven children, three now living— Susan M. Mary S. and Nathan Starr Carrington. His father came to Cook County in 1835, accompanied by his son Henry, who entered a piece of land near Holderman’s Grove. Mr. Carrington remained in Chicago until the spring of 1836, when he returned to Connecticut for the purpose of arranging his business for a permanent location in Cook County. In the fall of that year he returned to Chicago with Nathan S. the subject of this sketch, and was engaged in a brokerage and banking business with E. K. Hubbard until the fall of 1837, when he came to his farm in Lyons Township, where Nathan S. Carrington now resides, then containing 320 acres, now 230, with a wood lot of 165. In 1843 he again returned to Middletown, Conn., where he accepted the position of secretary and treasurer of the Middleton Savings bank He remained in Middletown, Conn., until his death, which occurred in 1871, at the age of ninety years. Mrs. Carrington died in 1825, aged forty four yearn. N. S. Carrington was in Connecticut from 1838 to 1849, when he returned and located on the farm purchased by his father. In 1841 he married Miss Laura Butler, They have had eight children, six living— Susan, Elizabeth, Mary, William, Laura and Edward. They are members of the Congregational Church. Mr. Carrington has been Commissioner of Highways, school trustee and school director for about fifteen years. He is Justice of the Peace, elected to fill a vacancy, and was Postmaster of Lyonsville Post Office from 1864 to 1879. The log house built by Morse, who made the claim in 1834, in still standing.


FROM:
History of Cook County, Illinois
From the earliest period to the present time.
BY: A. T. Andreas
A. T. Andreas, Publisher
Chicago 1884.