Biography of Hugh L. Kendall
Washington County, IA Biographies





Hugh L. Kendall was brought to Washington county when two years of age and though he afterward resided elsewhere for a period he was later long identified with industrial interests until his election to the office of county recorder, in which capacity he is now serving. He was born in Warren county, Illinois, March 13, 1844, and on the paternal side is of English descent, the Kendalls having come to this country from England at an early day and settled in Virginia, whence succeeding generations migrated to Maryland, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Illinois and Iowa. Margaret Kendall, who died in the middle of the seventeenth century, was the first white settler who died a natural death in the cove erected by a great grandson of James Kendall in Fulton county, Pennsylvania. Our subject's grandfather, Robert Kendall, was a native of that state and an early settler of Ohio. About 1830 he removed to Warren county, Illinois, and became quite prominent in the early history of that locality: His entire life was devoted to farming and he died in Illinois when in middle life. His wife was about sixty years of age at the time of her demise.

Their son, William W. Kendall, was born in Ohio and accompanied his parents on their removal to Illinois. He enlisted in the Black Hawk war but it is not known whether he took part in any engagements. In early life he learned the carpenter's trade but subsequently became a pioneer druggist of Washington, Iowa, arriving in this city in 1846 when it was a little village on the western prairie. Later he removed to Rock Island, Illinois, but in the fall of 1862 returned to Washington and soon afterward offered his services to his country, enlisting as a member of Company C, Nineteenth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, with which he served for nearly three years. He then returned to Washington, retaining his residence here throughout his remaining days. In early manhood he wedded Martha McFarland, a native of Ohio, while her father was a native of Pennsylvania, whence he removed to Kentucky and later went to the Buckeye state. His last years, however, were spent in Illinois. For some time he conducted a woolen mill. His family numbered three daughters and two sons, including Mrs. Martha Kendall, who died in 1905 at the age of eighty three years, having long survived her husband. They were both consistent and faithful members of the United Presbyterian church. Their children were: Anna J., the wife of James Latta; Arthur R.; Hugh L.; Rebecca, the wife of Fred Cramer; William Henry; Ross L.; Clark M.; Ida L., the wife of Ira Simonds; and Sarah E., a teacher in Chicago. Of this family Arthur R. Kendall was a soldier of the Civil war, enlisting from Rock Island as a member of Company C, Thirty seventh Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He veteranized and served for more than four years.

Hugh L. Kendall, brought to Washington when two years of age, here lived to the age of fifteen years and then accompanied his parents on their removal to Rock Island. He was but a youth of seventeen when he joined the boys in blue in defense of the Union cause. Hardly had the smoke from Fort Sumter's guns cleared away when on the 19th of April, 186i, he enlisted as a member of Company D, Thirteenth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, with which he served for three years and two months, holding the rank of corporal. He was wounded at Ringgold Gap, Georgia, and was in the battles of Chickasaw Bayou, Arkansas Post, Jackson, Mississippi, the siege of Vicksburg, Tuscumbia, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge and Ringgold, thus participating in many of the most hotly contested engagements of the war. After being wounded he went to New Orleans and was clerk in the quartermaster's department, his duties concerning water transportation.

When mustered out Mr. Kendall returned to Washington, Iowa, and in 1867 took up the business of house and sign painting, which he followed continuously until 1908, being accorded a liberal patronage because of his good workmanship. He has also been somewhat active in local affairs, serving as chief of the fire department for three years, while in November, 1908, he was elected county recorder and took the oath of office January 4, 1909. He was chosen to this position on the republican ticket, having always been a stalwart advocate of the republican party which was the defense of the Union during the dark days of the Civil war and has always been the party of reform and progress.

In December, 1869, Mr. Kendall was married to Miss Lucinda Moore, who was born in Ireland and in childhood was brought to America by her parents, who were also natives of the Emerald isle. Unto this marriage have been born two daughters, Effie D. and Belle. The former is the wife of Hubert Nicola, a resident of North English, Iowa, and they have one son, Leigh. Belle is the wife of W. A. Sutton, of Iowa City and they have a daughter, Dorothy.

Mr. Kendall is a member of Covenant Lodge, No. 101, I. O. O. F., and also of I. G. White Post, No. 145, G. A. R. His wife holds membership with the First United Presbyterian church. They occupy a good residence on North avenue B, which Mr. Kendall erected about 1888. They are well known in Washington, where they have long resided, and their many good traits have won for them the friendship and kindly regard of those with whom they have been brought in contact.

From:
History of Washington County, Iowa
From the First White Settlement to 1908
Vol II
BY: Howard A. Burrell
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Co.
Chiago 1909


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