Biography of Albert Hunter
Washington County, IA Biographies





Albert Hunter is now living retired in Washington in the enjoyment of well earned rest but for many years was closely associated with farming interests and contributed in large measure to the agricultural development of this county. He started upon life's journey in Knox county, Ohio, September 5, 1845, being one of the eight children of John and Elizabeth Ann (Paul) Hunter, who were natives of Ohio and Virginia, respectively. The paternal grandfather, George Hunter, was a native of Scotland but the opportunities of the new world attracted him and he became one of the early settlers of Ohio, where he was long associated with farming. He married Martha Conner and they reared several children. George Hunter died when past middle life while his wife reached an advanced age. Their son, John Hunter, also chose agricultural pursuits as his life work and, feeling that the new and growing state of Iowa offered attractive opportunities, he arrived within its borders about 1850, locating at Danville, where he remained for a number of years. His last days, however, were passed in New London. For several years he survived his wife who died at the age of thirty nine years. She was a daughter of William and Jane (Locke) Paul, both of whom lived to a ripe old age. Her father was a native of Virginia, served as a soldier of the war of 1812 and followed the occupation of fanning as a life work. Both Mr. and Mrs. John Hunter were consistent members of the Methodist church and their many good qualities won for them the esteem and high regard of all with whom they came in contact. Their children were as follows: Martha, the deceased wife of David McDonald; William, who has also passed away; Mary, who died unmarried; Albert, of this review; Adeline, the deceased wife of Absalom Hite; Margaret, the wife of A. C. White, of Battle Creek, Michigan; Maria, the wife of Hiram Finkle, of Woodland, California; and Harriet, deceased.

Albert Hunter was a little lad of five years when he came with his parents to Iowa, being reared on the home farm in Des Moines county, during which time he attended the district schools after arriving at the usual age. He was but nine years of age at the time of his mother's death and he then went to live with his grandfather with whom he continued until the fall of 1861, when he enlisted for service in the Civil war as a member of Company E, Fifteenth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, with which he served for three years and nine months. He was a youthful patriot of but sixteen years at the time of his enlistment. On one accasion he was struck by a spent ball but was not seriously injured. He served with the rank of sergeant and participated in the battles of Shiloh, Corinth, luka, Vicksburg, the entire Atlanta campaign, the memorable march to the sea under Sherman and many skirmishes. He was in the grand review in Washington, the most celebrated military pageant ever seen on the western hemisphere. Though young in years no veteran of twice his age was more loyal to the interests of the Union.

When the war was over Mr. Hunter returned to Des Moines county, Iowa, where he engaged in farming, but later resided for a short time in Page county, Iowa, and then removed to New London, Henry county. He continued his residence there for a few years and subsequently removed to Louisa county, where he purchased eight acres of land. That place was his home for about twenty two years, during which time he added eighty acres to the original tract while in his farming operations he met with gratifying success, placing his fields under a high state of cultivation. In 1896 he removed to Keokuk county, and in 1899 came to Washington county, living near Ainsworth, where he owned a farm of one hundred and sixty acres. Since 1901, however, he has maintained his residence in the city of Washington, for his activity in former years brought to him a substantial competence releasing him from the necessity of former business activity save the care which he gives his investments.

In October, 1869, Mr. Hunter was married to Miss Josephine Klingman, a daughter of Cyrus and Emma (West) Klingman. They became parents of a son and a daughter: Tennis W., a resident farmer of Washington township, who married Ella Glaze and has four children: Geneva, Clifford, Willard and Mary; and Jessie E., the wife of Samuel Baird, living on a farm near Ainsworth, by whom she has one son, Homer. The wife and mother, Mrs. Josephine Hunter, passed away in the '70s, and on the 19th of April, 1879, Mr. Hunter was again married, his second union being with Miss Sarah E. Ingersoll, who was born in Hamilton county, Ohio, a daughter of William and Nancy (Cooper) Ingersoll, who were also natives of the Buckeye state and came to Iowa in 1847, settling near Burlington, where her father died in 1880 at the age of seventy one years, while her mother passed away in 1876 at the age of sixty three years. They were the parents of eleven children, who reached adult age: Mary, the deceased wife of Isaiah Groves; Keziah, the wife of William Blair; Louisa, them deceased wife of William Sharp; Edward; William; Sarah E.; Clara, the wife of Jasper Matlock; Philena, the wife of Augustus Eggleston; Ella, the wife of Ransom Gore; Eugenia, the deceased wife of Frank Smith; and Peter: The paternal grandparents of Mrs. Sarah E. Hunter were John and Christina (Hill) Ingersoll, the former a native of Ohio and a farmer by occupation. The maternal grandfather, John Cooper, was also born in Ohio and followed agricultural pursuits. He married a Miss Symmes, who died in early womanhood.

The marriage of Albert Hunter and Sarah E. Ingersoll has been blessed with three children. Eva, the eldest, is the wife of George H. Paul, of Washington and they have two sons, Maurice and Dwight. Mary is a teacher in the Kalona public schools, and Grace is a stenographer. In his political views Mr. Hunter is a stalwart republican and has served as road supervisor and was township trustee and township clerk in Louisa county, Iowa. He has always been loyal in his citizenship, proving as faithful to his country in days of peace as when he followed the old flag on southern battle fields. He belongs to I. G. White Post, G. A. R. and thus maintains pleasant relations with his old army comrades. He is a member of the church board and a class leader in the Methodist church, of which both he and his wife are members. Mr. and Mrs. Hunter are both widely known in this county and have an extensive circle of warm friends while the hospitality of the best homes is freely accorded them.

From:
History of Washington County, Iowa
From the First White Settlement to 1908
Vol II
BY: Howard A. Burrell
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Co.
Chiago 1909


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