Biography of Thomas Gullion
Marion County, IA Biographies





THOMAS GULLION.
On the list of Marion county's honored dead appears the name of Thomas Gullion, who for an extended period was prominently and actively connected with agricultural interests in Indiana township, his labors bringing to him a substantial measure of success. He early recognized the eternal principle that industry wins and industry became the beacon light of his life. No matter how difficult the task which confronted him he accomplished it, for he was resolute, determined and persevering, and above all things he was thoroughly honorable in his business dealings.

Indiana numbered him among her native sons, his birth having occurred in that state, June 17, 1829, his parents being Jeremiah and Rebecca (McGrew) Gullion, both of whom were natives of Kentucky. They removed to Indiana at an early day and in the '40s came to Marion county, Iowa, arriving here before the admission of the state into the Union. This section was still largely undeveloped and unimproved, in fact, there were very few white settlers. The forests were uncut, the prairies uncultivated, the streams unbridged, and only here and there was to be seen the little cabin of the settler, showing that the seeds of civilization were being planted. The father secured land which he converted into a productive farm, upon which both he and his wife spent their remaining days.

Thomas Gullion was a youth in his early teens when the family came to Iowa and he shared with them in all of the hardships, trials and privations incident to pioneer life when neighbors lived miles apart and when farm work was very arduous, for there was none of the modern machinery of the present day. After reaching man's estate Mr. Gullion was united in marriage on the 1st of April, 1853, to Miss Hannah A. Simmons, who was born in Kane county, Illinois, a daughter of Benjamin and Frances (Sherwood) Simmons, both of whom were natives of Indiana. At an early day they removed to Illinois and in 1837 came to Iowa when this state was still a part of the territory of Wisconsin. They settled in Linn county, Mr. Simmons being the second man to pass the winter in that county. They secured a tract of land and, he built a log cabin with a clapboard roof and a puncheon floor and door, from which hung the latchstring, usually on the outside. There Was a mud and stick chimney and the only means of heating the cabin was the fireplace. After aiding in the pioneer development of Linn county Mr. Simmons again became identified with pioneer life, removing to the northwest and taking up his abode in Oregon in 1853. There he and his wife again took part in sowing the seeds of civilization in a wild district and their remaining days were spent in that state. In their family were twelve children, of whom five are yet living.

Following his marriage Mr. Gullion purchased three hundred acres of land in Indiana township and bent his energies to the development and improvement of the place. The opening of spring saw him at work in the fields and he carefully tilled the soil and cultivated the crops until the harvests were gathered in the late autumn. The methods which he followed were at once practical and progressive and brought gratifying results. He lived upon the farm until his death, which occurred in April, 1911.

To Mr. and Mrs. Gullion were born ten children: Margaret, now the wife of John Corkins; Rebecca, who married William Hall; Sarah, the wife of George Gruder; McClellan; Isaac J.; Danny, at home; John S.; and three who have passed away. After the demise of her husband Mrs. Gullion sold the home farm and purchased fifteen acres, where she now resides. This land is highly improved and to its further development and cultivation she gives her personal attention and supervision.

Mr. Gullion was a member of the Methodist Protestant church and his life was in harmony with its teachings. In politics he was a democrat and always took an active interest in the questions and issues of the day but did not seek nor wish for office. He believed, however, it was the duty of every true American citizen to exercise his right of franchise in support of the principles in which he believed and he at all times manifested a public spirited devotion to the general good. When death called him he was laid to rest in the Gullion cemetery, leaving a widow and seven children to mourn his loss.

From:
History of Marion County, Iowa
And its People
John W. Wright, Supervising Editor
W. A. Young, Associate
Vol II
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Co.
Chiago 1915


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