Biography of J. L. Marshall
Louisa County, IA Biographies





J. L. MARSHALL.
For many years the Alaskan lure has proved a magnetic force, attracting to the rich regions of that district adventuresome spirits from all parts of this continent. Not all, however, who responded to the call of the northwest were as fortunate as he whose name introduces this review, and therefore the story of the career of J. L. Marshall, with its chapters of adventure and its sequel of success, will prove of interest to the readers of this volume. He is one of Iowa's native sons, his birth occurring in Louisa county on the 3d of July, 1861. The parents, W. H. and Elizabeth Marshall, who were born in England and Virginia respectively, came to this county in 1844, during the pioneer history of this region, and here entered land upon which they resided throughout their remaining years. They were the parents of eleven children, of whom two have now passed away.

On the home farm in Louisa county J. L. Marshall was reared, attending the common schools near his father's home during the winter months, while the summer seasons were devoted to the work of the fields, thus acquiring thorough practical training. He remained under the parental roof until he attained his majority, when he embarked upon an independent career and for some time was engaged in agricultural pursuits. Subsequently, however, the fever of excitement and adventure possessed him and, deciding to seek his fortune in the northwest, started for Alaska in 1898 by boat. On reaching Skagway he reloaded his possessions on a lighter, which carried him as far as Dyea, and from that place he went to Canyon City with a team and pack mules. Again taking the water route he made his way to Sheep Camp, thence to the Scales at the foot of Chilkoot mountains, and at that point crossed the great divide between Alaska and Canada. Making his way over Long and Crater lakes, he passed through a large canyon to Lake Linderman and there built a sail boat, on which to cross that body of water to One Mile river. There is was necessary to freight his goods to Lake Bennett, from which place he went by boat to Windy Arrow, then to Marsh lake and on to Lake Labarge. Passing through White Horse rapids he sailed down the Thirty Mile river, through the Five Finger rapids to the Rink rapids and thence on up to Dawson. He remained at that place for a year and a half, after which he started for St. Michaels, Alaska, and thence he made his way to Nome, arriving at that city at the time of the big rush. In 1900 he traveled about one hundred and forty miles north into the Kougarok mining district, where he engaged in prospecting for a time. Striking some good leads he purchased several claims and for a number of years carried on mining with splendid results. After actively operating his mines for some time, during which period he met with excellent success, he went to eastern Washington and a few months later returned to Iowa, now making his home in Louisa county.

Mr. Marshall was married in 1892 to Miss Dora Brown, a daughter of J. K. and Ellen Brown, of whom mention is made on another page in this volume. Mr. Marshall gives stanch support to the democratic Party, although he has never sought nor desired public office for himself. Such in brief has been the record of one whose history, if told in detail, would read like a romance, with its interesting incidents and adventures of life on the trail and in the mining camp, and yet the success which has crowned that life has been substantial in an eminent degree and has ranked Mr. Marshall among the prominent and affluent men of Louisa county.

From:
History of Louisa County, Iowa
From Its Earliest Settlement to 1912
Vol II
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Co.
Chiago 1912


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