Biography of A. M. Lyon
Iowa County, IA Biographies





A. M. Lyon, of Marengo, one of the pioneers of Iowa county, was born in Williamsport, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, on the 12th of August, 1841, of the marriage of Isaac M. and Margaret (McBride) Lyon, both likewise natives of the Keystone state, where they grew to years of maturity and were married. In 1855 they emigrated westward, settling in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Some time later, anticipating the building of the Northwestern Railroad to Irving, the father removed with his family to that place and resided there for three years. In 1861 he came to this county and located in Marengo. A shoemaker by trade, he made the shoes for the people of Marengo and its vicinity in the days before the introduction of machines. About 1870 he retired and when seventy three years of age passed to his reward. His Fife lived to the age of seventy five years. He took an active part in public affairs and held a number of local offices, while for several years he served as county coroner. Both he and his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal church and its various activities profited by their cooperation.

A. M. Lyon, who was reared at home, received his education in the common schools and as he grew to manhood learned the shoemaker's trade under the instruction of his father. He watched carefully the events that led up to the Civil war and was among the first to respond to the call for three hundred thousand men, enlisting on the 9th of August, 1861, in them Union army. He was sent to Camp McClellan at Davenport, where he was mustered into the United States service as a member of Company G, Eighth Iowa Volunteer Infantry. He served for three years and eight days with that command and for one year was on scouting duty in Missouri, his first important battle being at Shiloh, Tennessee. He was captured on the 1th of April, 1862, and was confined in rebel prisons at Tuskaloosa and Montgomery, Alabama, and Macon, Georgia, and also at Libby prison, Richmond, Virginia. After being incarcerated in the last named place for five days he was paroled but in all he spent six months and fourteen days in southern prisons. He was sent to the parole camp at Benton Barracks, St. Louis, where his regiment was reorganized and after rejoining his command he participated in the Vicksburg campaign and was mustered out of service on the 28th of September, 1864. His last year in the army was spent on detached service in the Overton Hospital as steward of ward C.

Following his discharge Mr. Lyon returned to Marengo and worked at his trade in his father's shop for about eight years. At the end of that time his father retired and our subject became his successor and continued the business until 1881. In that year he sold out and entered the employ of William Burgy, a shoe merchant of Marengo, and he is still in the same store although the business has changed hands several times. O'Neill & Simmons are the present proprietors and for the last two years Mr. Lyon has conducted the repair business there on his own account. There is no detail of shoemaking that he does not understand and as he is painstaking in his work, taking pride in doing it well, he has a large share of the shoe repair business in Marengo.

In 1865 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Lyon and Miss Josephine Haverley, of Marengo, and to their union have been born six children, five of whom survive: Hattie E., the wife of H. R. Fritz, of Denver, Colorado; Mary E., who married Harry G. Clarke, of Chicago; Isaac M., cashier of the Northwestern National Bank at Sioux City, Iowa; Charles T., a druggist of Conroy; and Bessie K., the wife of Lee R. Swinehart, who is engaged in business in Marengo.

As its principles coincide with his political views Mr. Lyon supports the republican party at the polls and for three years was a member of the city council. He is a member of Marengo Lodge, No. 148, I. O. O. F., and Marengo Encampment, No. 47. He is an enthusiastic Odd Fellow and also holds membership in the Rebekabs. As a member of John Dillon Post, No. 233, G. A. R., he keeps in touch with those who, like himself, gave their services to the Union when it sorely needed the loyalty of brave men. His residence in this county covers more than a half century and he has watched with gratification the steady progress that has made possible the present state of development of Marengo and Iowa county.

From:
History of Iowa County, Iowa
And its People
By: James C. Dinwiddie
Vol II
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Co.
Chiago 1915


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