Biography of Charles F. Herrick
Buchanan County, IA Biographies





CHARLES F. HERRICK.
The predominant trait in the Herrick family is perhaps that of patriotism, for in the different wars of the country the family has been represented and among those who aided in defense of the Union in the darkest hour of our country's history was Charles F. Herrick of this review. In days of peace, too, he was equally loyal to his country and cooperated in movements for local progress and improvement. Thus it was that he became recognized as a citizen of sterling worth in Buchanan county and his death was the occasion of deep and widespread regret, when, in 1905, he was called to his final rest. His birth occurred in Lima, New York, in 1835.

Israel Herrick, his father, was of English parentage, but was born in Vermont in 1786. There is a long genealogical record of the family and frequently the name of Herrick appears in the annals of America in connection with the war history. Israel Herrick, Sr., grandfather of Charles F. Herrick, was one of the Minutemen of the Revolution and his son, Israel Herrick, Jr., was a soldier of the War of 1812. Then came Charles F. Herrick as a soldier of the Civil war and his son, C. G. Herrick, as a soldier of the Spanish-American war. Israel Herrick, Jr., was a carpenter and joiner by trade and removed westward from New England in 1858, at which time he took up his abode in Buchanan county. His son Charles, however, had come to this state in 1856, arriving on the day on which James Buchanan was elected president of the United States. After his arrival in Iowa Israel Herrick practically lived retired, although there is still standing as a monument of his handiwork one of the buildings which he erected after coming to Independence, where he remained a substantial and respected citizen to the time of his death.

When thirteen years of age Charles F. Herrick was apprenticed to the jeweler's trade, thoroughly mastering the business and becoming an expert workman in that line. In 1856, the year in which he attained his majority, he bade adieu to his old home in the east and came to Independence, where he opened a jewelry store, becoming one of the pioneer merchants of the city. He continued actively in the business until his death, which occurred forty nine years later. At different times he had partners, but never at any time did he sever his own connection with the store which he established in pioneer days. In his business he kept in touch with the advancement of the times and with the growth and progress of the county, carrying a large and well selected stock and enjoying a liberal patronage by reason of his honorable methods and earnest efforts to please his customers. For a time he conducted a music store in connection with the jewelry business. He possessed natural musical talent and was always active in musical circles.

In 1861 Mr. Herrick enlisted in the Eleventh Illinois Infantry at Rockford, becoming a member of the regimental band. Later such bands were discharged by general order and in 1864 he again offered his services to the government and was elected captain of Company D, Forty sixth Iowa. Infantry. After serving for a short time, however, he was sent home in a precarious condition because of camp sickness, being honorably discharged and mustered out before the company disbanded.

Mr. Herrick was united in marriage to Miss Sarah E. Sauerbier, who was horn in Easton, Pennsylvania, January 27, 1842, a daughter of George and Sarah A. (Haberacker) Sauerbier, both of whom were natives of Reading, Pennsylvania. The father, who was born September 21, 1805, died on the 5th of August, 1885. The mother, who was born February 26, 1815, passed away May 15, 1877. It was in 1855 that George Sauerbier came to Iowa, settling in Independence. He had engaged in the manufacture of hats when in Pennsylvania, but lived retired in Iowa, owing to ill health. The house which he erected in 1856 is still occupied by his daughter and her family. It was first used as a store when most of the city of Independence was on the west side. Mr. Sauerbier was an active and earnest member of the Presbyterian church, both he and his wife being widely recognized as people of sterling worth. They had but two children, including Mrs. Herrick, who has long been a prominent figure in social and religious circles of the city and interested as well in many civic problems.

To Mr. and Mrs. Herrick were born six children: Ellen A., Alice E., William S., Mary P., Sarah E. and Charles G. The eldest is now the wife of S. P. Rider, a retired wholesale dry goods merchant of Dubuque, and they have two children: Herbert, a dentist practicing in Milwaukee, Wisconsin; and Marie, the wife of Merrill Burch, of Dubuque. The third daughter, Mary P., became the wife of A. J. Schaefer, a dry goods merchant of Belvidere, Illinois, and they have four children. The fourth daughter, Sarah E., became the wife of Reece Tucker, a live stock dealer of Glenwood Springs, Colorado, and they have three children. The younger son of the family is Charles G. Herrick, now a jeweler and watchmaker of Independence, his father's successor in business. He learned the trade under the direction of his father, and in 1898 gave evidence of possessing the same patriotic spirit that has ever been characteristic of the family, for he joined Company E of the Forty ninth Iowa Infantry, of which he became sergeant and was also sergeant major of his regiment. With that command he went to Jacksonville and on to Havana, Cuba, thus defending American interests in the war with Spain. Since 1908 he has been continuously engaged in the jewelry business in Independence, ranking with the leading and enterprising merchants of the city. In 1900 he married Maude A. King, a daughter of Prettyman King, who was born in Defiance, Ohio, in 1841, and attended the Ohio Wesleyan University. He served as a captain in the Thirteenth Ohio Volunteer Cavalry and made a splendid record, participating in twenty four important battles. He was also present at General Lee's surrender. He married Miss Mattie Dorset, who died in 1868. Later Mr. King came to Iowa and for two years was engaged in the dry goods business in Independence. He then returned to Ohio and in 1872 again came to Iowa, being identified with general merchandising in Hazleton He was married again, his second union being with Amelia Manz His political allegiance was given to the republican party. By his first marriage he had three children, of whom Mrs. Herrick is the youngest. To Mr. and Mrs. Charles G. Herrick have been born two children, Bernice and Lucille. Like his father, Charles G. Herrick has been active in Masonic circles, holding membership with the lodge, the chapter, the commandery and El Kahir Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He has been junior warden and senior deacon in the blue lodge and was its master for two years. In the commandery he has been both the junior and senior warden and captain general. He also has membership with the Knights of Pythias.

Charles F. Herrick always took a deep and active interest in civic affairs and heartily cooperated in every movement for the benefit and upbuilding of town and county. He was one of the early mayors of the city of Independence, serving in 1868 and 1869. Again in 1896 he was appointed to fill out an unexpired term in that office and in 1905 was again elected the chief executive of the city, filling the position at the time of his death. That he was on three different occasions called to the office is indicative of the confidence reposed in him by his fellow townsmen. It also indicates that through the intervening years he never lapsed in his loyalty to the city and its welfare, but again and again gave evidence of his devotion to the public good. He likewise served as a member of the city council and was at all times an earnest advocate of republican principles, being one of the active members of the party in Independence. He figured prominently in the social as well as the political circles of the city and was especially active as a member of St James Episcopal church, serving for many years as a vestryman and as superintendent of the Sunday school. He was one of the most prominent Masons of Independence, passing through the blue lodge and later taking the degrees of eapitular, cryptic and chivalric Masonry. He also crossed the sands of the desert with the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He was a senior warden of his lodge in 1868, its master in 1869, 1870, 1883 and 1884. He likewise filled one of the principal offices in the chapter and in 1882 was elected eminent commander of the Knights Templar Commandery, which office he filled for twelve years. He belonged to El Kahir Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Cedar Rapids and from the time he became a member of the order he was ever a worthy exemplar of the beneficent spirit of the craft, its tenets and its teachings. His life was at all times honorable and upright and in every relation he commanded the respect, confidence and good will of his fellowmen. He contributed much to the material development of the city through his business activity and equally to its advancement along political, social and moral lines. He left behind him the priceless heritage of a good name and the memory of a life that may well serve as a source of inspiration and also as a benediction to those with whom he came in contact.

From:
History of Bachanan County, Iowa
And its People
By Harry Church and Katharyn J. Chappell
Vol II
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Co.
Chicago 1914


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