Biography of Harry C. Haines
Buchanan County, IA Biographies





HARRY C. HAINES.
On the pages of Buchanan county's history the name of Baines figures prominently in the pioneer chapter, for when this section of the stated was a frontier region the grandparents of Harry C. Haines settled here. Since that time representatives of the name have taken an active and helpful part in promoting the work of public progress and improvement and today Harry C. Haines is a well known representative of agricultural interests, owning land in Homer township, his place of residence being on section 36. He was born May 28, 1881, in the township where he still resides, his parents being William A. and Anna A. (Buell) Haines, the former a native of Zanesville, Ohio, and the latter of Canada. William A. Haines was but four years of age when brought to this county by his parents. At that time Quasqueton was the county seat and no one dreamed that Independence would become the center of county government nor that upon the site would spring up a notably thriving, enterprising and progressive town. From the time of his early arrival William A. Haines has continuously resided in the county with the exception of one year and he has been a very energetic and successful farmer. Year by year he carefully tilled the soil in the production of crops which brought to him a substantial income and at length when he had acquired a handsome competency he put aside business cares and since the spring of 1913 has lived retired, making his home in Rowley.

Harry C. Haines is a western man by birth, training and preference and is imbued with the spirit which has been the dominant factor in the upbuilding of this section of the state. He began his education in the district schools and afterward spent two terms as a student in the Charles City (Iowa) College. Later he entered the commercial department of the Upper Iowa University at Fayette, from which he was graduated on the 13th of April, 1902. He was thus well equipped by education for life's practical and responsible duties and he has since learned many valuable lessons in the school of experience. With the completion of his commercial course he returned home and began working with his father on the farm, where he remained until 1903, when he removed to a farm of one hundred and twenty acres on sections 35 and 36, Homer township, belonging to his father. Later he purchased forty acres of this, including the tract on which the buildings are located, and has since given his attention to the improvement of his farm, persistently carrying on his efforts year by year. He cultivates the fields in the production of crops best adapted to soil and climatic conditions here and he is also engaged in stock raising, making a specialty of handling dairy shorthorn cattle and high grade Duroc Jersey hogs. He is an excellent judge of stock, so that he is seldom, if ever, at fault in his judgment concerning the value of an animal which he purchases.

As a companion and helpmate for life's journey Mr. Haines chose Miss Clara E. Lindsay, their marriage being celebrated February 25, 1903. Her parents, Robert and Laura (Leininger) Lindsay, were natives of Canada and of Canton, Ohio, respectively. The father was a millwright by occupation and in early life crossed the border into the United States, settling in Virginia. It was in the Old Dominion that Mrs. Haines was born on the 16th of November, 1882. Her father there engaged in the millwright's trade and the flour mill business for nine years, after which he came to Buchanan county, where he carried on general agricultural pursuits for some time. He is now engaged in banking in connection with his son in law, C. Gunzenhauser, at Rowley, and is numbered among the leading and enterprising business men of that place. Mr. and Mrs. Haines are the parents of five children, as follows: Maude E., a maiden of ten summers; Elletha K., who is eight years old; and Lucille L., Marian B. and George William, who are six, four and two years of age respectively.

Mr. Haines votes with the democratic party but does not seek nor desire public office, although he keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the day. He and his wife hold membership in the Presbyterian church, and he is a Mason, belonging to both the lodge and the Eastern Star chapter at Rowley. He has never desired to change his place of residence, for he has always felt that this county offered excellent opportunities for the agriculturist and that its advantages in all general directions were equal to those to be found anywhere. He is a young man working steadily toward success and is now well known as a representative of the farming interests of his part of the county.

From:
History of Bachanan County, Iowa
And its People
By Harry Church and Katharyn J. Chappell
Vol II
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Co.
Chicago 1914


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