Biography of Hon. Thomas S. Marlor
Connecticut Biographies





HON. THOMAS S. MARLOR, BROOKLYN: Banker.

Hon. Thomas S. Marlor of Brooklyn is an Englishman by birth, though an almost lifelong resident of this country. He was born in England on the 10th of December 1839, but at the early age of two years came to America, his parents settling in New York, in which city, as a boy, he received his education at the public schools. He early engaged in mercantile business in the metropolis, but his tastes inclined him decidedly. toward financial pursuits, and at length he became a banker, a member of the New York Stock Exchange, and a prominent and successful operator among the active financiers of that great money center. Although having scarcely reached his majority at the breaking out of the war of the rebellion, Mr. Marlor was intensely loyal to the government of his adoption; and, unable himself to take up arms in its defense, he not only contributed liberally and freely through the ordinary channels, but at his own personal expense procured a recruit and sent him into the field, thus performing by proxy a duty which he felt to be upon him, but which was not proper or wise for him to undertake to perform in person. In 1869, having met with very gratifying success in business, and being desirous of disengaging himself to some extent from its burdens, Mr. Marlor purchased a tract of land in the village of Brooklyn, in this state, and erected upon it a handsome country residence, to which he retired with his family. He soon afterwards acquired considerable other real estate in the neighborhood of his home, and at once identified himself with the town of his adoption in the most thorough and liberal manner. He has in many ways manifested his public spirit and practical generosity, by the bestowment of various gifts and privileges upon the town, village, and religious society with which he is connected. The handsome soldiers' monument which stands on a public square in the village was wholly the gift of Mr. Marlor, as was the site of the state monument to the memory of General Israel Putnam, which occupies a commanding position in the vicinity of the memorial referred to. The Putnam equestrian statue was erected by the state, but the site and all improvements thereon, including the grading, the heavy granite coping, and the granite roadway, were provided by Mr. Marlor at his own personal expense, to the acceptance of the state monument commission. Probably no individual citizen of Brooklyn ever gave so liberally and voluntarily of his time and money for the benefit of his fellow citizens and the improvement and beautifying of their village as the subject of this sketch has done since he first made that delightful town his permanent abode. Mr. Marlor has several times been called to accept positions of public service and trust, but he has been disinclined to office holding and has refused more importunities of this kind than he has accepted. Although claimed by the democrats, he is an independent in the best political sense, and his elections to office have almost invariably been by such majorities as to show the voice of the people rather than of any particular party. Mr Marlor has twice represented Brooklyn in the general assembly, and once the sixteenth senatorial district in the upper house. He has repeatedly declined renominations for both branches of the legislature, and in 1886 received the nomination of the democratic congressional convention, but refused to accept. In addition to his political services Mr. Marlor has rendered important aid in civil affairs of local concern. He is one of the corporators of the Prisoner's Friend Society, and also of the Brooklyn Savings Bank. He is an active member of the Episcopal Society of Brooklyn, and is always ready to perform his part in every movement which has in view the welfare and proper entertainment of the people and particularly the education and refinement of the rising generation. He is not now in active business, though retaining his membership in the New York Stock Exchange. He therefore has the leisure as well as the inclination and the means to gratify his laudable ambition to make the world better and happier while he is on the stage of action. Mr. Marlor married, early in life, Miss Mary F. Loper, and there have been three children, two of whom, both adult sons, are living and residing in their native town. The homestead is on the Pomfret road, just on the edge of Brooklyn village, a delightful spot where many a guest has tasted and enjoyed the abounding hospitality of Mr. Marlor and his accomplished wife.

From:
Illustrated Popular Biography
Of Connecticut
Compiled and Published by J. A. Spalding
Press of the Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co.
Hartford, Conn. 1891


Privacy Policy for OnlineBiographies

NAVIGATION
Connecticut
Biographies

Online
Biographies

California
Biographies

New York
Histories

New York
Biographies

Maine
Histories

Pennsylvania
Histories

Pennsylvania
Biographies

For all your genealogy needs visit Linkpendium