Biography of R. R. Kirkpatrick
San Luis Obispo County, CA Biographies





R. R. KIRKPATRICK, of San Miguel, is one of the prominent citizens of San Luis Obispo County, a man of large experience in various directions, and a veteran of both the Mexican and the great civil wars. His grandfather, John Kirkpatrick, was a Scotch-Irish man, who came to America before the Revolution, and did the colonists valuable service as a soldier; later he was in the war of 1812. He settled in Pennsylvania, and there his son, John L. Kirkpatrick, the father of the subject of this sketch, was born. He married Miss Nancy Larimore, also a native of Pennsylvania, and they have four sons and three daughters, of whom R. R. was the fourth child. He was born in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, December 9, 1826, and as he grew he learned the use of carpenter's tools from his father, who was a boat builder. Immediately after the declaration of war with Mexico he enlisted at Louisville in the Fourth Kentucky Infantry, and under the command of General same time, from which wound he never fully recovered. He has a pension of $12.50 per month from the Government. As this wound incapacitated him from marching, he was sent on detached duty as a recruiting officer in Iowa; and he was also engaged in conducting recruits and drafted men to the front. He also served as Quartermaster, having charge of Camp Distribution from Fort Gaines. Next he was sent to the Rio Grande, and finally to New Orleans to be discharged. In the summer of 1865 he was mustered out at Davenport, Iowa.

Winfield Scott his regiment held the city of Mexico from January until July 4. Returning then to Louisville, he was there discharged. He was afterward at several places, and in two or three businesses until in July, 1862, when he enlisted in Company A, Twenty ninth Iowa Infantry, of which company he was elected Second Lieutenant.

Then he was engaged in express business between Omaha and Council Bluffs, making money; next he was in a grocery at Council Bluffs, and then in the ice business. In 1877 he came with I. E. Blake to San Francisco, in order to establish the Continental Oil and Transportation Company, and Mr. Kirkpatrick took charge of the Oakland office five years. Then in 1882 he came to San Luis Obispo County, and filed a claim to his present ranch of 320 acres of choice land, three miles due east of San Miguel. On a sightly and picturesque spot on a hill, in the midst of trees, vines and flowers, he has built a pleasant and commodious residence; and he has a large variety of fruit trees growing luxuriantly, and many of them loaded with fruit. The prevailing sorts are peaches, pears, apricots, prunes, figs, almonds and filberts. The locality is 1,250 feet above the sea, and he does not irrigate. He is also raising hay and grain, besides horses, cattle and poultry. He is a Freemason and an Odd Fellows, and Chaplain of the G. A.R. Post at San Miguel. For a time he held the office of Justice of the Peace. Mr. Kirkpatrick is a well informed gentleman, of pleasant manner, and remarkably successful in his comparatively new vocation of farming and fruit raising on his "Pleasant Dale" ranch.

October, 1862, the company was mustered in and marched 100 miles to St. Joseph, and thence to St. Louis, where for a time they were on provost duty. From there they were ordered to Columbus to intercept General Forrest; next they were sent to the White River expedition, returning to Helena. Soon afterward they were engaged in a light at Fort Pemberton, and again at Helena. Mr. Kirkpatrick was then detailed with a company of sharpshooters, and had several engagements with guerrillas. When in Helena with about 3,000 men, they were attacked by General Price with 25,000 men. This rebel General thought he had a "sure thing," and had been boasting that he would "eat breakfast in Helena or in hell." The attack was made at daylight, and the Union forces killed and took more prisoners than they had men; Price was defeated and failed to get the bounteous breakfast prepared for him by the citizens of Helena; their houses were filled instead with wounded men. A shell in that engagement tore Mr. Kirkpatrick's clothes, but did not draw blood. The soldiers were sent to Little Rock and participated in taking that place.

The next campaign in which Mr. Kirkpatrick was engaged was that of General Banks at Shreveport. A piece of shell struck him in the groin, and for a long time he was paralyzed. His hip wads also injured at the

In 1849, in Allegheny City, he was united in matrimony with Miss Libby Lloyd, a native of that city; five of their six children are now living. The first four were born in Allegheny City, viz.: Inez, Alice, Ida and Albert; Ellen was born in Nebraska, and Libby in Sioux City. Inez married J. W. Perregoy, a wholesale tobacconist of Council Bluffs; Alice lives with her father, and has 160 acres of land near him; Ida is married to Mr. Frank E. Shepard, and they reside at Council Bluffs; Elliot is also married and lives on the San Marcos in this county; and Libby, with her husband, Charles E. Fowler, occupy land near their father's. Atter fifteen years of wedded life, Mrs. Kirkpatrick died, and in 1874 Mr. Kirkpatrick married his present wife, who was Mrs. Annie Walker, the widow of Frank Walker, and a native of Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Kirkpatrick are Presbyterians.

From:
A Memorial and Biographical History
of the counties of
Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo
and Ventura, California
The Lewis Publishing Company
Chicago 1891


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