Biography of Sterling D. Carr
San Francisco, CA Biographies





STERLING DOUGLAS CARR
Descendant of one of the prominent pioneer families of northern California, and an attorney in the foremost rank of the San Francisco bar, is Sterling Douglas Carr, whose birth occurred in Monterey county, California, November 25, 1876.

Mr. Carr is a son of the late John Sterling and Florida (Nichols) Carr. His paternal grandfather, Jesse D. Carr, was an influential pioneer of northern California, and was noted as a banker and stockman. John Sterling Carr was born in Nashville, Tennessee, and when he was ten years of age he made the trip to California in company with a brother who was two years his senior. He attended Santa Clara College, and subsequently engaged in ranching and mercantile pursuits in association with his brother. He was the first to be elected mayor of Tucson, Arizona, and in that new state he was very successful, having amassed a fortune. He was assistant postmaster of San Francisco during the first Cleveland national administration. His death occurred in 1910. Florida (Nichols) Carr, mother of the immediate subject of this biography, was a daughter of John G. Nichols, who was the captain of the first train of covered wagons to come to California by the southern route. The journey required eight months to complete, and many hardships and dangers were encountered. John Nichols, a brother of Mrs. Carr, is believed to be the first white child born in the city of Los Angeles. Mrs. Carr married her husband in Los Angeles, and by this union there were three children born, namely: Sterling D.; Jessie R., widow of John S. Bryan; and Florida C., wife of John S. Cook. Mrs. Carr passed away in the year 1916.

Sterling D. Carr began his education in the public schools of San Francisco and later entered the Belmont School at Belmont, California, from which he was graduated in 1895, thereafter spending two years as a student at the University of California. He was inspired to make the law his life's career, consequently took up his studies at the Columbia Law School, from which institution he received the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1900. In the same year that he received his diploma, he was admitted to the California state bar, and established himself in active practice in San Francisco. He has had marked success in the conduct of litigation, and has acquired a clientele of eminent class. From July 11, 1924, to September 30, 1925, he served with merit as United States district attorney for northern California. His law offices are situated at 310 Sansome street.

On July 18, 1927, Mr. Carr was united in marriage to Mrs. Mary (Grayson) Hinckley, a native of California and a daughter of the late George W. Grayson, prominent for many years in this state as a miner and ranch owner. Mr. and Mrs. Carr now reside at 666 Post street in San Francisco. Both are popular members of local social circles, and both maintain a real interest in civic affairs of the bay district.

Mr. Carr became a member of the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity during his collegiate days, and he now belongs to the Pacific Union Club and the Commonwealth Club. His political support has customarily been given to the republican party, while his religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Episcopal Church. In the practice of law, Mr. Carr has created for himself a prestige based on his ethical methods, loyalty to his clients, sportsmanlike conduct toward his contemporaries, and extraordinary ability. He is popular in his work and respected.

From:
The History of San Francisco, California
Lewis Francis Byington, Supervising Editor
Oscar Lewis, Associate Editor
The S. J. Clark Publishing Company
Chicago-San Francisco 1931


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