Biography of Edwin Graham
Humboldt County, CA Biographies





EDWIN GRAHAM. - The climate of southern Humboldt county is particularly favorable for the propagation of fine fruits, some of the choicest varieties reaching perfection of color and flavor here, and although there is a relatively small number of fruit growers it is being steadily augmented by those who have investigated the advantages of the location. The new railroad line of the Northwestern Pacific, affording improved transportation facilities, is another argument to attract agriculturists of this class. Edwin Graham has a valuable homestead about eight miles northeast of Harris, off the Harris and Alderpoint road, and is at present specializing in the production of fine fruits, having about twenty five acres planted in choice varieties and yielding abundantly in response to the intelligent care he has given them. He is a most capable worker, attending faithfully to the numerous details of orcharding, which keep him busy in practically all seasons.

Mr. Graham was born November 6, 1856, at Adel, Dallas county, Iowa, about twenty five miles west of Des Moines. Francis S. Graham, his father, was a prominent official and business man of that section for years, holding the county offices of assessor and treasurer eight years each. Selling his farm for $30,000, he embarked in the banking business, building the Bank of Dallas county, but he had reverses, and after the failure of his bank came out to Napa county, Cal., where he died in 1912, at the age of eighty seven years. His widow died January 28, 1915, in Dallas county, Iowa, when almost eighty five. Five children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Francis S. Graham; Morris J., the present county clerk of Dallas county, Iowa; Edwin; John P., who died leaving a wife and three sons; Mary Elizabeth, wife of J. L. Sinicoke, druggist, at Adel, Iowa; and William F., who is in business at Perry, Dallas county, Iowa.

Edwin Graham grew up on his father's farm in Iowa, and had the educational advantages afforded by the neighboring schools. After his father's business losses he clerked in stores at Adel and Minburn, Iowa, following that kind of work for many years. The day after his marriage to Miss Adel Winans, of Adel, Iowa, he started with his wife for California, arriving at Healdsburg, Sonoma county, in October, 1877. After clerking there for two years he removed to Petaluma, where he was in the employ of Joseph Campbell, a pioneer merchant of that place, continuing with him for three years, when he engaged in ranching three miles out of town. In the fall of 1886 he removed to Willits, where he was a dealer and shipper of poultry and eggs. During this time he drove a band of two hundred turkeys overland from Willits to Cloverdale, where he sold them at a good profit. In the fall of 1889 he removed to Ukiah, where he accepted a position in the old Ukiah House. For ten years he acted as head clerk and bookkeeper at the old Ukiah House, and meantime, in 1893, took up the homestead in southern Humboldt county which he now cultivates and resides upon, having one hundred sixty three and twenty three hundredths acres, of which twenty five acres are cleared and planted in fruit. He has over five hundred trees set out, including two hundred peach trees, principally Muirs, although he also has Wheatland, Triumph, Foster, Susquehanna and Strawberry varieties; fifty fig trees of the White Adriatic variety, besides San Pedro White, San Pedro Black and California Mission; apples, Early Harvest, Yellow Transparent, Summer Sweet Paradise, Red Astrachan, Gravenstein, Yellow Belle flower, Ben Davis, Wallbridge, Newtown Pippin and Arkansas Black; pears, Bartletts, Winternellis and Howell; prunes, Tragedy, German, French, Imperial Epinuse, Silver and Sugar; plums, Kelsey Japans, Imperial Gage, Washington, Jefferson and First Best; besides six hundred grapevines, Mission, Muscat, Alexander, Mrs. Pince, Thompson Seedless, Black Malvoise, Isabelle, Muscatel and Zante currants; blackberries, Himalaya Mountain, Lawton, Mammoth, Oregon Evergreen, Loganberries and Burbank's Phenomenon; raspberries, Evergreen Red. Mr. Graham has taken great care in the selection of his fruit stock, and is reaping the results. In addition to his orchard work he is giving some attention to stock growing, raising about $500 worth of hogs annually. There is still considerable timber on his property, pine, spruce and tan oak, the latter especially valuable, not only for the bark, but also for the lumber, which is beautifully grained, takes on a high polish, and is strong and durable, particularly desirable for the manufacture of fine furniture. Mr. Graham has won the highest respect of his neighbors by his industrious devotion to his work, and he is regarded as one of the most intelligent, progressive ranchmen in his locality, where he is helping to raise and maintain high standards by his own fine productions.

Mr. and Mrs. Graham have one child, David Morris Graham, now in the employ of Livingston Brothers, San Francisco, as head window trimmer; he married Miss Hattie Babbage, of San Francisco.

From:
History of Humboldt County, California
With a Biographical Sketches
History by Leigh H. Irving
Historic Record Company
Los Angeles, California 1915


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