Biography of Charles Hadlen
Alameda County, CA Biographies





CHARLES HADLEN
In the death of the late Charles Hadlen the city of Berkeley lost one of its influential men of affairs and a representative citizen, who through a long period of years was active in efforts leading to the development and progress of his community, standing consistently for all that was best in the life of the city and county. As the day with its morning of hope and promise, its noontide of activity and accomplishment, its evening of completed and successful effort, ending in the grateful rest and quid of the night, so was the life of this good and honored man. His career was a long, busy and useful one, fraught with much good to himself, his family and to humanity, and his memory will long be revered by those who came in contact with him on life's highway.

Mr. Hadlen was born in Hanover, Germany, September 22, 1846, and was reared on his father's farm, securing his education in the public schools. In 1866 he came to the United States, settling in San Francisco, California, for a time. He then went to Montana and engaged in mining for a few years, after which he returned to San Francisco and opened a grocery store. Later he went to Alviso, Santa Clara county, where he was employed in a starch factory until 1879, when he came to Berkeley, where his friend, John Everding, owned a starch factory, and, being a starchmaker, was given employment here. About ten years later he quit that line of work and for about nine years was employed as a clerk in George Burns' grocery store in Berkeley. In 1898 he bought property at the corner of Ninth street and University avenue and engaged in the grocery business with marked success for many years. His death occurred at his home, at 947 University avenue, Berkeley, on July 15, 1927, in the eighty first year of his age.

On March 18, 1875, in San Francisco, Mr. Hadlen was united in marriage to Miss Dora M. Funk, who also was born in Hanover, Germany, where she was reared and educated. In 1873, at the age of seventeen, she came to the United States, landing at San Francisco on September 18th. She is.a daughter of Peter and Anna (Miller) Funk, the father dying when she was but two years old and the mother when she was five years of age. She received religious confirmation when fourteen years old and from that time she earned her own livelihood as a housemaid. She was encouraged to come to America by an older sister who was living in San Francisco, and in that city she met Mr. Hadlen. To their marriage were born seven children, namely: Anne who is the wife of D. M. Newell, who now runs the Hadlen grocery store; Charles, who married Miss Emma Brombacker, died at the age of forty four years and left three children, Elmer, Stanley and George, who are in school; Julia is the wife of A. A. Gibb, a retired business man in Oakland, and they have one child, Clyde; Herman, who died November 26, 1927, at the age of forty five years, was married twice and by his first union had three children, Lillian, Dorris and Mazie; Fred, who died on October 15, 1919, at the age of thirty five years, had married Miss Dena Hoffman and left three children, Roy, Dorothy and Mildred; Mabel is the wife of George S. Hopkins, who is connected with the Pacific Gas and Electric Company in Berkeley, and they have four children, Harriet, Edith, Robert and Lucile; and Edward C., who is deputy county clerk of Alameda county and resides in Berkeley, was married to Miss Rose McGlinchey and has a daughter, Florence. There are twenty two grandchildren and nine great grandchildren. In 1925 Mr. and Mrs. Hadlen celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of their marriage, and it was a most enjoyable occasion, at which they were the recipients of the congratulations and well wishes of their large circle of friends.

In his political views, Mr. Hadlen was a stanch republican and ever maintained a deep interest in public matters, particularly such as related to the prosperity and welfare of his community, in the affairs of which he was long an influential factor. He assisted in framing the first city charter and was a member of the first board of trustees, in which position he served the city faithfully and judiciously. He also rendered valuable service as a member of the first board of the Berkeley City Planning Committee, on which committee he served for six years. He was proud of his city and zealous in its interests, no measure for its advancement or betterment ever lacking for his earnest and active support. He was kindly and generous by nature and the Golden Rule was the standard to which he conformed his actions, so that he was a friend to all men, and all who knew him were his friends. A man of well defined opinions and high ideals, he stood uncompromisingly for what he believed to be right, from which fact he received the nickname "Old Ironsides," as he was sometimes affectionately called. The record of testimony is ample that he was a good citizen in the fullest sense of the term, and he left to his family the priceless heritage of an untarnished name and to the city he loved so well the record and example of an honorable and well spent life.

From:
History of Alameda County, California
BY: Frank Clinton Merritt
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Co.
Chicago, Ill 1928


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