Biography of Benton Dick
Arizona Biographies





BENTON DICK, Attorney at Law, Phoenix, while a comparative stranger in the legal circles of that city, is well known in other parts of the State. both in legal and general business circles. Previous to his removal to Phoenix he was District Attorney of Pima County almost eight years, having served from 1905 until the coming of statehood, when he refused to again become candidate for the office, as he considered the advantages of a substantial practice in the Capital City decidedly more attractive. Mr. Dick was born in Brownville, New York, in 1873. His father, Henry Dick, was there a pioneer in railroad work, having spent many years as conductor on the Rome, Watertown & Ogdensburg, and later on the New York Central railroad. Before coming to Arizona Benton Dick was employed by the latter road as train dispatcher, and frequently issued orders by which his father's train was conducted. Mr. Dick graduated from the High School, Camden, New York, but by continued study and close application, the advantages of his school course have been greatly enhanced. After his graduation he wads employed for a short time in a mercantile house, but preferring to engage in railroad work, he learned telegraphy, and when but eighteen years of age was appointed train dispatcher, in which capacity he served eight years. In 1900 he came to Arizona; and was train dispatcher for the Southern Pacific at Tucson. He first secured a position as dispatcher for the Santa Fe, but having always been a strong union sympathizer, after ten days went out with the union when a strike was ordered. While in Tucson he resumed the study of law, which he had begun in the East, completed the course, and was admitted to practice in the Supreme Court. Mr. Dick organized the first Order of Railroad Conductors on the Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburgh railroad, and was an active member during the telegraphers' strike in 1907, having made a number of addresses in behalf of the strikers. Mr. Dick regards as one of the memorable events in his career as a railroad man the fact that he issued orders for the special train which carried the late President McKinley, the friend of the railroad man, over his division during the President's last trip through Arizona, and he highly regards a copy of the schedule prepared for the train on which the martyred President rode on that journey. He has been particularly active in politics during his residence in Arizona, is a thorough' Republican, and he it was who made the speech nominating Ralph Cameron in the last Territorial campaign, when he was elected Delegate to Congress. He also toured the State and made many addresses during that campaign. In 1893 Mr. Dick was married in Oswego, New York. and has four children, Ruth, Herbert, Russell and Virginia, the latter a thoroughbred Arizonan.

From:
Who's Who in Arizona
Vol 1
Compiled and Published by Jo Conners
Press of The Arizona Daily Star
Tucson, Arizona 1913


Privacy Policy for OnlineBiographies

NAVIGATION

Arizona
Biographies

Online
Biographies

New York
Histories

New York
Biographies

Maine
Histories

Pennsylvania
Histories

Pennsylvania
Biographies

For all your genealogy needs visit Linkpendium

Family Tree Maker 2012