Biography of Judge Albert C. Baker
Arizona Biographies





JUDGE ALBERT C. BAKER was born at Girard, Russell County, Alabama, February 15, 1845, and is a graduate of the East Alabama Male College. He served two and one half years in the Confederate Army as color bearer for Waddell's Battalion of Artillery. When vet a young man he moved to Missouri, thence to California, and subsequently located in Phoenix, Arizona, in the early part of 1879 and opened a law office. His skill and tact as a lawyer soon became common knowledge in Arizona and today he is practically without a rival in the State in the conduct of a case before a jury. The published law reports and the dockets of the courts bear abundant evidence of his activities. Scarcely a case of great importance has been tried in the State for a decade in which he has not appeared as counsel for one side or the other. He was a delegate to the Constitutional Convention from Iaricopa County and in that body was of great service to the State. He espoused the cause of many of the new features in the Constitution without becoming hysterical or dangerously radical. Judge Baker was appointed Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Arizona by President Cleveland and filled that high office for one term with great credit to himself and great satisfaction to the people. His written opinions are unaffected, short, simple, direct and blaze the way so clearly that there is no room to doubt what is precisely decided. As a judge he was upright, honest and fearless. Judge Baker is blessed with the happy faculty of dressing up a thought in a way that appeals with great force to the emotions. At a banquet before the City Club of Phoenix he once paid a tribute that is worthy of preservation to the pioneers of Arizona. He said: "The soldier leads an assault in the blare of trumpets and the roll of drums. It lasts but a minute. He knows that whether he lives or dies immortal fame is his reward. It is not so with the pioneer. When this soldier of peace assaults the wilderness no bugle sounds the charge. The forest, the desert, the savage beast and savage man lurk to ambush him; he blazes the trails, fells the trees, turns the streams and plants his rude stakes; his self possessed soul keeps its fingers on his lips and no lamentations are heard. When civilization joyously comes with unsoiled sandals over the trails he has blazed, and homes and temples spring up on the soil he has broken, his youth is gone, hope is chastened into silence and he sinks into a dreamless bivouac under the stars. The world merely sponges his name from the slate and self satisfied civilization accepts his toil without compensation and frowns with horror at his rough and rugged ways. But he is content. The shadows of the wilderness have been chased away, the savage beast and savage man have fled, the fields ripen to yellow grain and seats of learning and temples of worship dot the plains; the perfume of flowers and songs of children gladden all the land and he smiles upon the younger generation and is content."-By J. W. Spear.

From:
Who's Who in Arizona
Vol 1
Compiled and Published by Jo Conners
Press of The Arizona Daily Star
Tucson, Arizona 1913


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